Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Call for proposals from AALS Section on Part-Time Programs

Call for proposals:

Unbundling Part-Time Programs from Full-Time Programs

The AALS Section on Part-Time Division Programs is soliciting panelists to discuss and describe ways that law schools have created curricular and extra-curricular offerings for part-time programs that are specifically designed for the schedule and needs of part-time students, rather than mirroring the full-time program.

If your school has an innovative or unusual schedule for part-time students, creates different course configurations from the full-time courses, provides internship or extra-curricular activities designed especially for the part-time program, or in some other way unbundles the part-time program from the full-time program, please take this opportunity to highlight these programs or activities.

ASP professionals might also have insight into innovations or initiatives specifically tailored to support the academic success of students who fit the demographic profile of students in part-time programs: older and returning students with work and family responsibilities.

Proposals need not be long or complicated. Please send a short description of the feature you would like to share with the section. Length of presentations may vary, depending on the final number. Proposals should be forwarded by April 18 to: 

lskillin@hawaii.edu

(808) 956-3002

Liam Skilling

William S. Richardson, School of Law

University of Hawaii

April 10, 2012 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 11, 2012

Call for Proposals: AALS Section on Academic Support, January 2013 Meeting

 Call for Proposals

AALS Section on Academic Support

January 2013 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana 

Assessing Our Students, Our Successes, and Our Selves 

In response to a growing need within the legal academy, many institutions and individuals have developed programs to assure the success of law students as well as techniques to assess both programs and students.  To broaden the impact of such efforts, the Program Committee seeks proposals highlighting the theme of assessment. What should we assess and how do we accomplish the necessary measurements? Topics might include, but are not limited to, helping new faculty design formative assessment measures for doctrinal classes; evaluating the impact of existing academic or bar support programs on bar passage rates; identifying at-risk students before they start law school; motivating entitled students to work hard enough to succeed; managing time and prioritizing tasks to derive maximum benefit from decreasing budgets; or using empirical studies to impact curricular and programming decisions.  

Preference will be given to presentations designed to engage the workshop audience, so proposals should contain a detailed explanation of both the substance of the presentation and the methods to be employed.  Individuals as well as groups are invited to propose topics.  The Committee would prefer to highlight talent across a spectrum of law schools and disciplines and is especially interested in new and innovative ideas. Please share this call with colleagues—both within and outside of the legal academy and the academic support community—who are experimenting with assessment methods or doing empirical research.    

Based on participant numbers for the last several years, we anticipate over 100 people attending the program. 

Proposals must include the following information:

1.  A title for your presentation.

2.  A brief description of the objectives or outcomes of your presentation.

3.  A brief description of how your presentation will support your stated objectives or outcomes.

4.  The amount of time requested for your presentation. No single presenter should exceed 45 minutes in total.  Presentations as short as 15 minutes are welcomed.

5.  A detailed description of both the substantive content and the techniques to be employed., if any, to engage the audience.

6.  Whether you plan to distribute handouts, use PowerPoint, or employ other technology.

7.  A list of the conferences at which you have presented within the last three years, such as AALS, national or regional ASP or writing conferences, or other academic conferences.  (The Committee is interested in this information because we wish to select and showcase seasoned, as well as fresh, talent.)

8.  Your school affiliation, title, courses taught, and contact information (please include email address and telephone number).

9.  Any articles or books that you have published that relate to your proposed presentation.

10. Any other information you think will help the Committee appreciate the value your presentation will provide. 

Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis, so please send yours as soon as possible, but no later than Monday, April 2d to Prof. Barbara McFarland, Northern Kentucky University, Salmon P. Chase College of Law at mcfarlandb1@nku.edu. If you have questions, contact Barbara McFarland at 859.572.7637.

The Section on Academic Support Program Committee:

Barbara McFarland, Chair

Emily Scivoletto, Past Chair

Robin Boyle Laisure, Past Chair

Robert Coulthard

Steven Foster

Danielle Kocal

Claire O’Keefe

Mary Steefel

Brendon Taga

Dan Weddle

Lisa Young

ASP Section Chair:  Herb Ramy

 

March 11, 2012 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

NY Academic Support Workshop-Friday, April 13

Dear ASP friends;

We are pleased to announce this year’s full-day NY Academic Support Workshop, to be held from 9:30 to 5:30 at New York Law School on Friday, April 13.  As usual, this will be a small and rather intensive gathering of academic support professionals and colleagues actively working to learn from one another. 

One thing that makes all ASP gatherings exciting has always been our unique emphasis on interaction – ASP folks DO things together so that we can learn together. To capture that spirit, for this year’s NY Workshop we are going to work with one another to develop or enhance our individual lessons, materials, presentations, or any other part of our professional endeavors. 

Participants should come with a problem, a set of teaching materials, or a specific student issue that you have been thinking about and want to work on with your colleagues. You’ll show us what you’ve got so far, explain what constraints or concerns you have, and we will work as a group to resolve, refine or sharpen what you have developed. In the process we’ll all benefit from exchanging ideas, and when the workshop concludes all participants will leave with copies of the ideas, learning modules and other materials generated through our collective wisdom.

No one who comes is allowed to be a back-bencher.  If you would like to attend, please let us know whether you want to share one of your own issues, ideas, etc., comment on ones brought by other participants, or both.  When we confirm who will attend and what specific questions the participants plan to address, we will send out a finalized workshop agenda.  RSVP to Kris at kris.franklin@nyls.edu

Since this is not a formal conference there is no fee to attend.  If you would like advice about hotels, etc., please let one of us know.  And if you’d love to attend but just don’t have the budget to stay overnight, talk to one of us and we’ll see if it is possible to help you find housing with local ASP folks.

Hope to see many of you soon!

Kris Franklin                                        Linda Feldman                                                   Martha Peters

New York Law School                     Brooklyn Law School                                       Elon School of Law

kris.franklin@nyls.edu                   linda.feldman@brooklaw.edu                   mpeters3@elon.edu

 

February 7, 2012 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Remember the AALS Academic Support One-Day Conference!

The AALS One-Day Workshop will be held on Saturday, January 7, 2012 in Washington, DC during the Annual Meeting.   The day’s title is: “Got ASP?  Leveraging Academic Support Principles and Programs to Meet Strategic Institutional Goals.” The event will run from 8:45 AM – 5:00 PM and includes many speakers, moderators, and dynamic presentations.

AALS will hold a Luncheon that day, with a  fee of $65.  At the lunch, Darby Dickerson, Dean of Texas Tech University School of Law, will introduce Stephen Zack, ABA President.   He will address the importance of diversity to legal education and the legal profession and why providing practical skills training in law school benefits the profession and greater community.  I encourage you to attend the presentations and the lunch – it should be a terrific day.

The Section on Academic Support will hold its Business Meeting from 5:00 PM – 5:15 PM in the same room following the One-day Workshop.

In lieu of the full day program and lunch on Saturday, the Section on AS will not be holding a breakfast or a Section program.

You may register for the One-Day Workshop and the luncheon by using the registration materials in your Annual Meeting program booklet or by going online to the AALS website.   (The AALS Workshop appears on pages 80 – 83 of the booklet). Please note that when registering online for both the One-Day Workshop and the Luncheon, you may receive a prompt asking if you should override the conflicting events.  The answer is “yes.”

Thanks for your support and anticipated participation.

The Planning Committee for the 2012 Annual Meeting Workshop on Academic Support:

Darby Dickerson, Chair, Texas Tech University School of Law Robin Boyle, St. John’s University School of Law Paula Lustbader, Seattle University School of Law Russell McClain, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

 

Along with AALS Officers:

Susan Westerberg Prager, Executive Director, CEO Jane La Barbera, Managing Director Mary Cullen, Meetings Manager

 

December 29, 2011 in Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Save the Dates for the 2012 LSAC Workshop in Denver

The Law School Admission Council has announced that the LSAC Academic Assistance Training Workshop will be held at University of Denver Sturm College of Law in Denver, Colorado.  The dates are June 13 - 16, 2012.  The announcement listed the heading as "1992 - 2012: 20 Years of Academic Assistance, Training and Support.

LSAC will send out details closer to the time.  They always post the conference details to the ASP listserv, and we will post information here on the Blog when it is available.

The Planning Committee this time is:

Rodney Fong, Chair, Golden Gate University School of Law

Odessa Alm, Florida Coastal School of Law

Paula Manning, Western State University College of Law

Jeff Minnetti, Stetson University College of Law

Mark Padin, Hofstra School of Law

Mary Steefel, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Save the dates on your calendar.  This national workshop is always a special time for ASP'ers to hear terrific presenters and share ideas with one another.

December 8, 2011 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 3, 2011

CORRECTION: Deadline to register for the NECASP conference: NOV 15

Please note:

The deadline for registering for the NECASP conference at BC Law is Nov 15.

My apologies for forgetting to add that to the original post.(RCF)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New England Consortium of Academic Support Professionals Annual Conference

ASP Without Stigma: Serving Our Diverse Populations”

Monday, December, 5, 2011

Boston College Law School

9am-2:30 pm

Please join us for the third annual NECASP conference at Boston College Law School. This year’s conference will feature admissions professionals and law students discussing who to best attract and serve the increasingly diverse law student population.  Keynote speaker will be Jacq Nance, Assistant Director of Admissions, UConn Law School, who will speak about what type of support students look for in law schools.

Schedule:

9-9:15-Registration

9:15-9:30-Welcome Address by Dean Vincent Rougeau, Boston College Law School

9:30-10:30-Keynote Address by Jacq Nance, Asst. Director of Admissions, UConn Law School

and Tracy West, Assistant Dean for Students, Diversity Initiatives, and Academic Advising, Boston College Law School

 Followed by Q and A

10:45-11:45-Mason Dunn, UNH Law student, LGBT issues and ASP

Followed by Q and A

12-1-lunch and law student panel

                Jennifer Kent, BC Law School, BLSA President

                Ramey Sylvester, The University of New Hampshire School of Law Diversity Action Coalition

1-2-group discussion of hypothetical situations encountered in ASP

2-2:30-Conference Wrap-Up

 

Registration:

$25, payable by check to NECASP by NOVEMBER 15

Please mail checks to:    Elizabeth Stillman-Suffolk Law School

120 Tremont Street

Boston, MA 02108-4977

November 3, 2011 in Meetings, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 20, 2011

NECASP Annual Conference Reg Info

New England Consortium of Academic Support Professionals Annual Conference

ASP Without Stigma: Serving Our Diverse Populations”

Monday, December, 5, 2011

Boston College Law School

9am-2:30 pm

Please join us for the third annual NECASP conference at Boston College Law School. This year’s conference will feature admissions professionals and law students discussing who to best attract and serve the increasingly diverse law student population.  Keynote speaker will be Jacq Nance, Assistant Director of Admissions, UConn Law School, who will speak about what type of support students look for in law schools.

Schedule:

9-9:15-Registration

9:15-9:30-Welcome Address by Dean Vincent Rougeau, Boston College Law School

9:30-10:30-Keynote Address by Jacq Nance, Asst. Director of Admissions, UConn Law School

and Tracy West, Assistant Dean for Students, Diversity Initiatives, and Academic Advising, Boston College Law School

                Followed by Q and A

10:45-11:45-Mason Dunn, UNH Law student, LGBT issues and ASP

Followed by Q and A

12-1-lunch and law student panel

                Jennifer Kent, BC Law School, BLSA President

                Ramey Sylvester, The University of New Hampshire School of Law Diversity Action Coalition

1-2-group discussion of hypothetical situations encountered in ASP

2-2:30-Conference Wrap-Up

Registration:

$25, payable by check to NECASP

Please mail checks to:    Elizabeth Stillman-Suffolk Law School

120 Tremont Street

Boston, MA 02108-4977

 

October 20, 2011 in Current Affairs, Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Save the date! NECASP Conference, 12.5.2011

SAVE THE DATE! December 5, 2011

ASP Without Stigma: Serving Our Diverse Populations

Please save the date for the 3rd annual New England Consortium of Academic Success Professionals (NECASP) conference, ASP Without Stigma: Serving Our Diverse Populations. The conference will be December 5, 2011, 9-2:30, hosted by Boston College Law School, Newton, Massachusetts.

More details will be coming in late September. Hope to see you there!

August 31, 2011 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Meeting announcement for "Helping the Helpers: ASP Basics from Orientation to the Bar"

HELPING THE HELPERS

ASP BASICS: FROM ORIENTATION TO THE BAR

 

DATE:              August 4-6, 2011

           

(Guests should plan to arrive early in the evening August 4 and to leave either in the evening of August 6 or the next morning.  The formal program will go two full days – August 5 and 6.  In addition, there will be a reception on August 4 and there will be hosted dinner outings on the evenings of August 5 and 6.)

 

REGISTRATION FEE:  $35 (Registration form attached to this e-mail.)

 

LOCATION:     Western State College of Law

                        1111 N. State College Boulevard

                        Fullerton, CA 92385

                        (714) 738-1000          

 

DESCRIPTION:  The purpose of the workshop will be to equip attendees with the basic tools necessary to work with the diverse population of students whom academic support professionals serve.  Topics covered will include (1) overall program design, (2) orientation and first semester programs, (3) later semester programs designed for struggling students, and (4) bar preparation.  Attendees also will be given “lessons in a box” to use in their own programs.

 

                        A more detailed agenda will follow.

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:  This program is designed for/open to professionals who have been working in academic support for three years or less.  The maximum number of attendees is 50.  If we do not reach maximum capacity, the program will be opened to additional participants.

 

HOTEL INFO:   Fullerton Marriott at Cal State University

714-447-6673

 

To book online, guests can go to www.marriott.com/laxfl and enter the codes below under "group code":

 

LSALSAA for one king bed

LSALSAB for two double beds

                       

                        Conference rate: $99/night (Must be booked by July 19, 2011)

 

 

We hope to see many of you there.  Look for other e-mails from us with information about the other workshops shortly.

 

Regards,

 

The LSAC Academic Assistance Topical Workshops Planning Subcommittee:

                Russell McClain, Chair

                Paula Manning

                Odessa Alm

                Hillary Burgess

Kent Lollis

LSAC Staff

 

June 8, 2011 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 6, 2011

The importance of getting together with colleagues

Yesterday I met with other members of the ASP community at the NECASP (New England Consortium of Academic Success Professionals) at BC Law for our annual business meeting. While we did take care of business, the primary value in the meeting was the exchange of ideas between others in the Academic Success community. Amy's wonderful post on exhaustion highlights the importance of rejuvenation, and meeting with colleagues can help remind you of the importance of peer support. In addition to the joy of swapping stories with friends in the ASP community, I learned about some fantastic innovative programs at New England law schools. This is my shout-out:

1) UNH Law's Sunny Mulligan and Alice Briggs summer program for select incoming law students.  Tremendous effort that went into planning a program that builds on the strengths of other summer programs, while bringing a unique New Hampshire touch to their program. Sunny and Alice have had great success avoiding stigma (the great bane of ASP) by embracing transparency in their programs. Sunny also talked about the innovative partnership between Career Services, ASP, and the Externship Program at UNH. I believe UNH is on the cutting edge with their program, and it is something all of us should be exploring during this time of belt-tightening at law schools.  

2) Alex Ruskell at Roger Williams runs both the Honors Program and ASP. This is a neat, and somewhat unusual, group of duties, but it has benefits. Coming to the ASP office loses it's stigma (fast!) when it is as likely the student is visiting because they are in the Honors Program as it is they are looking for help. Alex also has a fantastic summer program for incoming students, and he had several ideas I plan on using if I go back to working on pre-orientation.

3) Lis Keller at BC was not only a gracious host, but brought up some challenging theoriesabout who ASP should serve. This is a concept we are looking at in more depth for our fall conference. BC Law's first-year orientation occurs three weeks into the semester, when students are ready to hear about outlining and preparing for exams. This approach to orientation inspired a lot of discussion within our group about how this can be employed at other schools. Many of us felt that some of what we do in orientation goes over the heads of our students who have no context before the start of the semester. BC's approach is one that I envision more schools will employ if they can find a way to fit it into 1L schedules.

4) Louis Schulz and Elizabeth Bloom at New England-Boston filled us in on the details of their comprehensive ASP, which includes programs for students through all three years of law school. Louis is always moving a thousand miles an hour, and the breadth of programs sponsored by NE-Boston demonstrate his energy and ingenuity.

5) Liz Stillman and Janet Fischer from Suffolk facilitated discussion among our group on the benefits and possible costs to students when ASPer's write job recommendations. This is a timely topic, as we are being bombarded with stories about the state of the job market. Janet made the connection between the job market and the upswing in interest in ASP that many of us are seeing.

I came home from the meeting excited about the innovation within ASP, and grateful that I belong to such a wonderful, warm, supportive community. (RCF)

 

May 6, 2011 in Advice, Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 11, 2011

Second Annual Empire State Legal Writing Conference--May 12-13

Teaching Legal Writing Effectively to Prepare Students for Practice
Friday, May 13, 2011

Hosted by St. John’s University School of Law to be held at 101 Murray Street, Manhattan (Downtown)

ALWD Scholars’ Forum

May 12, 2011

Thursday, May 12th, ALWD Scholars’ Forum:  Looking for participants to present their scholarship ideas or works-in-progress to legal writing scholars.  Lisa Eichhorn and Marilyn Walter will be providing critique during the workshop, in addition to St. John’s Robin Boyle.  Lisa Eichhorn is Professor of Law and Director of the Legal Writing Program at University of South Carolina School of Law.  She serves as a Member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute.  Marilyn Walter is Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School and Director of the Legal Writing Program.  She was the 2005 recipient of the AALS Legal Writing Award.  She also served on the Editorial Board of the Journal of the Association of the Legal Writing Directors.  Robin Boyle is the Assistant Dean for Academic Success and Professor of Legal Writing at St. John’s.  She currently serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute and on the Board of Directors for the LWI.  PLEASE SEND ALWD SCHOLARS’ SUBMISSIONS TO ROBIN BOYLE: boyler@stjohns.edu.

Friday, May 13th, Second Empire State LW Conference will focus on creative teaching ideas  attendees can implement immediately in their own classroom.  Our keynote speaker, Professor Tina Stark, will illuminate key points in teaching transactional drafting.  The conference will feature over 50 presenters from around the country. Various themes will be intertwined throughout the day, such as the following:  ethics, professionalism, and plagiarism; reaching today’s millenials;  grading efficiently; perspectives from the bench, bar, and clinical programs; experiential techniques; polishing drafts; oral presentations; lessons from international law; and current-day email memos.  

Registration:  Registration is free for both the Empire State Conference as well as the Scholars’ Forum.  Participants will be able to register on-line.  Here’s the link  : http://bit.ly/hKG0WF.

(Please note: hotel information has been cut for space in the blog post. Please contact the conference for more info on hotel)

Times of the events:

The ALWD Scholars’ Forum will begin on Thursday, May 12th at 11:30 AM and end by 5:00.

The Empire State Conference on Friday, May 13th will open with Registration and Continental Breakfast at  8:15 AM.  The Dean’s Welcome is at 9 AM. The first session will begin at 9:30 AM.  The last session will conclude by 5:20 PM.  There will be six 50-minute sessions with four simultaneous presentations.  Lunch and coffee breaks will be provided.

The Empire State Legal Writing Conference Program Committee:

Robin Boyle, Conference Chair; Assistant Dean for Academic Success and Professor of Legal Writing, St. John’s University School of Law, boyler@stjohns.edu.

Ian Gallacher, Associate Professor of Law; Director, Legal Communication and Research, Syracuse University College of Law.

Tracy McGaugh, Associate Professor of Legal Process, Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center.

John Mollenkamp, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of Academic Support, Cornell University Law School.

Stephen Paskey, Lecturer in Law, Legal Research and Writing Program, University at Buffalo Law School.

Amy R. Stein, Professor of Legal Writing, Coordinator of the Legal Writing Program, Assistant Dean for Adjunct Instruction, Hofstra University School of Law.

Marilyn Walter, Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School.

April 11, 2011 in Meetings, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Still room for the NY ASP Workshop in April

The following is a recent listserv posting from Kris Franklin about the upcoming ASP Workshop (modified because of format problems - still not perfect):

Dear Friends,

A tentative agenda for this year’s NY Academic Support Workshop, to be held at Brooklyn Law school from 9:30-5 on Friday April 1, as pasted on below.  There may still be room for one or two agenda items, and there’s definitely room for folks to join in the conversation even if not leading a discussion.  If you’d like to come for even part of the day, please email me at

kris.franklin@nyls.edu or Linda Feldman at linda.feldman@brooklaw.edu

.  If I’ve left anyone off who has already rsvp’d, my apologies (just let us know and we’ll make the needed corrections).

Workshop participants, if you have materials to share, please send them to Linda as soon as possible so that we can bind them and make copies available to everyone who is coming.  We’re so looking forward to seeing you all, and to what looks like a comprehensive and exciting event.

Kris Franklin

New York Law School

Current topics for the NY Workshop:

Designing the curriculum through ASP eyes

Pursuing a curriculum that promotes a cycle of learning throughout law school and practice; Twinette Johnson & Joyce Savio Herleth, Saint Louis

Thought experiments in crucially (re)evaluating law school teaching; Mary Lu Bilek, CUNY

Working with student services and faculty committees; Charlotte Taylor & Suzanne Darrow-Kleinhaus, Touro

ASP courses for credit: adding them and teaching them; roundtable facilitated by Everett Chambers

What teaching business law to undergrads can teach us about curriculum construction; Shane Anthony Dizon, NYU

Improving law students’ reasoning and analysis

Contemporaneous processing in student conferences; Alison Nissen, Rutgers

Formative assessment of essay writing skills; Heddy Muransky, Nova Southeastern

All I need to know I learned playing Apples-to-Apples™; Kris Franklin, NYLS

Pros and cons of a non-graded legal analysis practicum; Robin Boyle, St. John’s

Open agenda

Creating an effective learning environment for students from under-represented communities; Micah Yarbrough, Widener

Is there such a thing as "too much" academic support?; Danielle Bifulci Kocal, PACE

How can upper-level students help to run an ASP program?; Jessica Pollock Simon, U Penn

Closed book/open book exams and bar passage; Angela Baker, Rutgers/Camden

Dancing your way to academic success; Haley Meade & Danielle Friedman, NYLS

 

March 2, 2011 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 17, 2011

ASP Section at AALS

There will be additional posts on AALS, but this is a brief overview of the program and the new AALS ASP section officers (Congrats to my co-editor, Dr. Amy Jarmon!)

The program, co-sponsored by Student Services and Balance in Legal Education sections, was a huge success with great turnout. It was a packed house, with every seat filled.

The program started with a brief memorial to Prof. Bruce Winick, who passed away this year. Prof. Winick was a giant in the legal academy, therapeutic justice, and the humanizing legal education movement. He will be deeply missed.

The first panel was Deborah Rhode, Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado, and Nancy Levit, discussing the current state of emotional well-being for law students. The statistics were sobering, but it was wonderful to hear so many folks so concerned about the happiness and well-being of law students and actually working to do something about the challenges to law students and recent grads.

The next panel was Paula Manning, Corie Rosen, Russell McClain, Rebecca Flanagan (me), joined after by Andrew Faltin. Paula et al got the program rocking with a song and dance (no joke) on how optimism, feedback, and programming can enhance law student well-bring. Andrew closed the section with information on how to use student self-evaluatuations to create happier law students.

The last panel, Laurie Zimet and Paula Lustbader, showed the audience how to get to know their students in"3D". Laurie and Paula provided some excellent tools to help professors get past their pre-conceived ideas about their students and help see them for who they are, not just a face in a seat. We closed out the day with Larry Krieger, the guru of law student balance and happiness, discussing his latest research on autonomy support and student success.

At the close of the program, the ASP business meeting announced the section officers for the 2011-2012 year:

Chair: Michael Hunter Schwartz

Chair Elect: Paula Manning

Immediate Past Chair: Robin Boyle

Secretary: Rebecca Flanagan

Treasurer: Herb Ramy

Executive Board:

LaRasz Moody, Emily Scivoletto, Louis Schulz, and Dr. Amy Jarmon

(RCF)

January 17, 2011 in Academic Support Spotlight, Current Affairs, Meetings, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Recap of the NECASP Conference at UNH

Congratulations to Sunny Mulligan and Alice Briggs for hosting the Second Annual New England Consortium of Academic Support Professionals (NECASP) at University of New Hampshire! 

The December 6th conference drew participants from 12 states and the District of Columbia.  You know just from that widespread geography that the day provided much needed information on multiple-choice and essay test construction and exam-taking techniques.

After opening remarks by Dean John Hutson welcoming us, the focus turned in the morning to multiple-choice questions.  The morning panel included Susan Case (National Conference of Bar Examiners), Janet Fisher (Suffolk Law School), and Richard Litvin (formerly Quinnipiac and now working privately with bar takers).

Susan Case provided very useful information on methods for assessment (types, skills assessed, and limitations of each format), construction of multiple-choice questions (components, issues of content, editing the scenario, lead-in, and options), and general guidelines for writing questions.   

Janet Fisher provided some interesting insights on how undergraduate assumptions about multiple-choice translate poorly to law school: familiarity with the material is enough and figuring it out during the exam will work.  Both assumptions miss the need to master the rules of law.  Janet suggested that an "item writing" party might encourage professors to garner feedback from colleagues and develop a pool of questions for professors in a subject area to use.

Richard Litvin focused on the bar exam multiple-choice questions, using questions from earlier exams that now vary from the current MBE format.  Although the older questions are not well-written in comparison to the newer MBE format, Richard finds them to be good tools to teach the law to bar takers. 

After lunch, the panel members turned to essay question writing and teaching students to answer them.  The afternoon panel again included Susan Case and Richard Litvin.  They were joined by Alfred Zappala (teaching bar preparation for Northeastern and Suffolk).

Alfred Zappala focused on the method he teaches to Massachusetts bar takers (Read 4 minutes, Organize 8 minutes, Write 24 minutes; four-page essay answers) which he suggested could be modified for other states' essay exam time limits.  He stressed the need for students to write out a large number of essays to learn the techniques that are necessary for success.  He commented that students should think of it like baking a cake: the bar course can give them the recipe, but they have to bake the cake. 

Susan Case then talked about the skills tested by essay questions, drafting and editing of content, and grading issues.  Again her material was very instructive for professors who wish to improve their test construction. 

Richard Litvin focused on bar exam essay questions with an emphasis that students have to achieve mastery of at least 75% of the material and familiarity with another 20% to succeed.  He stressed that attention has to be given by faculty to what the breakdown of questions and topics is on the bar so that they know what areas are currently being tested.  He recommended that students strive for long-term memory and use a Topic-Rule-Application-Conclusion format (rather than some other formats that are out there).

In the end, one mantra was repeated both by panelists and participants when it comes to the bar exam essays: Know Your Own State's Bar/Bar Examiners.  The differences from just the variety of states represented at the conference clearly showed that one state's exam might vary substantially from another state's exam.

Another mantra was repeated as to faculty test construction: Know Your Own Faculty.  Each law school faculty will vary in its willingness to seek and take advice on test construction, grading, and other issues. 

The day was worthwhile whether participants specifically wanted to know about law school testing or bar exam testing.  (Amy Jarmon)

   

December 21, 2010 in Exams - Theory, Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 22, 2010

Report from the LSAC Regional Workshop: Building a Bar Program

The recent LSAC regional workshop, “Building a Bar Program” was filled with useful information regarding every aspect of law school bar preparation programs.  

The agenda included:

 Carlota Toledo’s virtual presentation via Skype: “Using Skype to Reach Out of State Bar Takers”

 Courtney Lee’s presentation: “Building a Continuum of Academic Support”

 My Bar Exam Related Work in Progress: "Legitimizing and Integrating Bar Preparation Programs"

Laurie Zimet’s presentation:  “Diversity in the Profession”

Twinette Johnson’s presentation: “An Introduction to Program Design: Convincing Your Faculty that a Program is Valuable and Viable”

Jennifer Carr’s presentation:  “The Voluntary Third Year Program”

Barbara McFarland’s presentation:  “The For-Credit Program”

Odessa Alm’s presentation:  “The Post Graduation Program”

Paula Manning’s presentation:  “Psychology and Stereotype Threat”

Lessons in a Box:

            Chris Ide-Don’s lesson on “Multiple Choice Exams” 

            Russell McClain’s lesson on “Performance Exams” 

            Dan Weddle’s lesson on “Essay Exam Writing"

Mary Lu Bilek’s presentation:  “Defining Success: Evaluating and Improving Your Program”

As you can see by the list of presenters, we were graced by a stellar group of ASP veterans.  The conference was useful for ASPers looking to add bar preparation elements to their academic support program, create a new bar support program or enhance a current bar support program at their school.  Although I gained many new insights from the presentations, the most important take away from the two day conference for me personally was the feeling of camaraderie, encouragement, collaboration and support that was apparent in every presentation, interaction and discussion.

Additionally, this conference provided me with my first opportunity to present.  I greatly benefited from the process of preparing my presentation and the constructive feedback I was given during my presentation.  Presenting a work in progress is an interesting and appealing endeavor.  The “work in progress” or article is not complete (or possibly even started), you may have some ideas stewing but do not have concrete conclusions per se, and you have endless possible directions that your article may take.  Essentially, this incredible flexibility allows you to safely go out on limb. 

Once I came to grips with the fact that my work in progress was still just a work in progress and not a polished finished product, I could focus on what I wanted to gain from my session.  New insights, a critique of my current ideas, comments on organization and structure, and suggestions for expansion or narrowing were a few of my goals.  Not only were those goals met, but a thoughtful discussion of my topic (Legitimizing and Integrating Bar Preparation Programs and Techniques into the Broader Law School Curriculum) ensued.  More importantly, with every raise of a hand or comment given, I felt overwhelming support for my article but really that support was for me. 

My initial nervousness faded as I fully engaged with a truly dynamic group of individuals.  As Mihaly Csiksezentmihalyi would characterize it, I was experiencing “flow”.  Not everyone agreed with my initial thoughts, many even played the role of devil ’s advocate by challenging my premise, ideas and research, but I remained focused and motivated in a strangely euphoric state.  Wow, it was fun!

I write this post not to exalt my article or draw attention to my presentation.  Instead, I write this post to encourage everyone to take advantage of such opportunities in the future.  When you see, “Call for Proposals”, in an email subject line, do not automatically hit the delete key.  If you are excited to present or publish but do not know where to start, simply ask!  Ask someone at your school that you respect, ask someone you admire that has presented or published a piece that has inspired you, ask through the ASP list serve, or ask me. 

There are increasingly more opportunities to advance your scholarly ideas or innovative teaching techniques.  Although many of us are too busy to even keep up with our daily work schedules, you should not let finding the time hold you back.  The benefits you reap from presenting, writing, or researching far out weigh the burden it may place on your schedule.  In addition, the support and encouragement is a great confidence boost.  Find your “flow” and go out on a limb, you won’t regret the experience.

Many thanks to LSAC, Kent Lollis, and the planning committee(Odessa Alm, Hillary Burgess, Paula Manning, and Russell McClain), for the Topical Conference and for giving me the opportunity to present my work in progress. 

(Lisa Young)

October 22, 2010 in Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams, Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 12, 2010

Tips for getting the most out of conferences

Alas, it is conference season. I know many ASPer's are just getting back from Elon Law School and LSAC's conference on counseling. I wish I could have joined everyone, but sadly, I am still in a travel freeze.  After 5 years, and countless conferences, here are some tips for making the most of the experience:

1) Be social, even if you are an introvert

Yes, sadly, ASP can be sort of clique-y.  It's not intentional; many of us have known each other for many years, and some of us worked together for years before we switched schools, moved, etc. However, it is worth remembering that 90% of us where the uncool kids in school growing up (we were way too smart) so we welcome everyone as adults. We are not mean girls (and boys), I promise. Say hi. If you are shy and uncomfortable, let us know. Most of us were uncomfortable at our first conferences as well. The only way to get the advice and help you want is to break into the cliques and start talking to people. Really, we are like a congregation of kindergarten teachers once you know us.

2) Be a joiner, even if you are not a joiner.

You need exposure. To get exposure for your program, school, etc, you need to join things. AALS, LSAC, Institute for Law School Teaching and Learning, Humanizing Legal Education. When you are at those conferences, be a joiner. Go to the (sometimes stupid and quirky) social functions. Join subcommittees.  When you join things, be social and let people get to know you and what is great about your program. The legal academy is a tiny place, so everyone knows someone at your school. This is instrumental for your career. You never know when you may need a phone call placed on your behalf to your boss/dean, letting her/him know what a great job you are doing. the only way to for that to happen is to be social, and be a joiner.

3) Ask questions

We tell our students there are no stupid questions, and then we are afraid to ask questions as conferences for fear of sounding stupid. As someone who has presented a ton, I don't think I have ever heard a stupid question.  We completely understand that people new to the profession need to ask basic questions. We want to help. Conferences are places where you should be asking questions.

4) Toot your own horn. No one else will.

While being social, be sure to mention your accomplishments. If you feel like you don't have any accomplishments, then just tell people what you are doing.  No one else is going to let others know the great things you are doing at your school. ASPer's are the modest, non-competitive ones in the legal academy, which is self-defeating at times.

5) If you are would like to present at a conference in the future, tell somebody

The powers-that-be (that change from year to year, conference to conference) don't know if you would like to present unless you let people know. ASP is unlike other areas of the legal academy, in that you don't necessarily have to write a paper in order to present something that you are doing. While we are a many-talented group, I haven't encountered any mind readers among ASPer's as of yet. 

(RCF)

July 12, 2010 in Academic Support Spotlight, Advice, Encouragement & Inspiration, Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 21, 2010

Institute for Law Teaching and Learning Conference - Register by 6/4/10

The following is an announcement posted on several listservs by Michael Hunter Schwartz at Washburn:

 

The deadline for registering for the 2010 Institute for Law Teaching and Learning Conference, “Teaching Law Practice Across the Curriculum,” is June 4.  The conference is June 17 and 18 with an optional teaching lab on the 16.  Here’s a link to information about the conference-- http://lawteaching.org/conferences/2010/, and here’s a link to the registration form-- http://lawteaching.org/conferences/2010/registration/

May 21, 2010 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Report from the NY regional ASP workshop

Friday was the annual NY regional ASP workshop; the workshop from which all other regionals have been born. Thanks again to Kris Franklin and Linda Feldman for doing an awesome job, even if Kris tells  everyone that participants do all the work. All attendees deserve a pat on the back for braving a snowstorm that shut down the NYC public schools. 

The morning session opened with a group exercise facilitated by Professor Micah J. Yarbrough, Widener School of Law (Delaware campus) and Everett Chambers of Texas Wesleyan.  Through this group exercise a colleague (Linda Feldman of Brooklyn Law and Susan Zusman of William Mitchell)  was selected to present a “problem or classroom challenge” to the workshop.  Attendees then through a series of guided conversations, assisted the colleague in assessing the challenge, resulting teaching decisions made and any embedded motivations within.  The result was that the presenter as well as participants benefited from thoughtful collective reflection on issues common to many involved in academic and bar program support including student/teacher and faculty/administration relationships, the motivations underlying student intervention, and professional development within the Academy.    “Rounds” was introduced at last year’s workshop by Mary Lu Bilek and David Nadvorney of CUNY Law with so much success, it was repeated again this time around.

Our afternoons were a roundtable discussion on a topic of the presenters choice. Angela Baker of Rutgers-Camden presentedon the process of getting faculty approval for bar courses for credit. David Epstein of NYLS presented some fascinating statistics on the differing study habits and perceptions of study habits between day and evening law students. Susan Feathers of Albany Law presented on teaching courses outlining to students. Everett Chambers presented a question for thegroup on how to structure student-led spring semester study groups to reduce 1L attrition in ASP programming.  I presented on my experiences teaching a hybrid doctrinal-ASP course to 2L's. And finally, Kris Franklin had us play a game that can be used with students to teach reasoning skills.  Kris's game was a spectacular success on many levels, and taught me I am a bad loser (my apologies to Everett!) 

As other regionals come up, please send me or Amy a synopsis of events and we will be happy to post on the blog. Remember, everyone in ASP has something to share that is valuable to the community, no matter how new you are to the field. (RCF)

(Thanks to Micah Yarbrough for composing the blurb on the morning events)

 

March 3, 2010 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 26, 2010

Call for proposals for AALS joint program 2011

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW SCHOOLS – 2011 Conference

A Joint Program of the Sections on Balance in Legal Education and Academic Support

Co-Sponsored by the Section on Student Services

Theme:  “Beyond Humanizing:  Can – and Should – Law Schools Strive to Graduate Happy Students?”

Students often enter law school with goals of helping others, improving peoples’ lives, and making the world a better place.  By the time they graduate, however, other considerations have supplanted students’ pro-social inclinations.  Their aspirations succumb to more extrinsic values, such as prestige and money, and are often faced with the realities of time pressure and the dehumanizing effects of legal education.  Despite the prestige associated with being an attorney, the profession is not ranked in the top ten for job satisfaction or happiness.  In fact, one recent study revealed that a majority of practitioners would not recommend law to a young person.

Three AALS Sections, Balance in Legal Education, Academic Support, and Student Services will be hosting a program in which we explore the causes of lawyer distress, the role legal education plays in producing unhappy law students and lawyers, and the concrete steps law schools are currently taking or could take to combat those causes.  The Program Committees invite proposals that provide concrete demonstrations of ways doctrinal, clinical, legal writing, and academic support professors and student services professionals are addressing these concerns.

The Program Committees will give preference to presentations designed to actively engage the workshop audience, so proposals should contain a detailed explanation of both the substance of the presentation and the interactive methods to be employed.  In addition, we would like to highlight talent across a spectrum of law schools and will look for variety in presentations and presenters.  Based on participant numbers for the last several years, we anticipate over 150 people will be attending the program.  To assist the presenters in the interactive piece, the program committee members and other volunteers will be on hand to act as facilitators with audience members.

Proposals must be one page and include the following information:

1.  A title for your presentation.

2.  A brief description of the objectives or outcomes of your presentation.

3.  A brief description of how your presentation will support your stated objectives or outcomes.

4.  The amount of time allocated for your presentation and for the interactive exercise. No single presenter should exceed 45 minutes in total time allowed.  Presentations as short as 15 minutes will be welcomed.

5.  If warranted, a detailed description of how the presentation will be interactive.

6.  Whether you plan to distribute handouts, use PowerPoint, or employ other technology.

7.  Your school affiliation, title, courses taught and contact information (include email address and telephone number).

Optional and on a separate page:  A list of the conferences at which you have presented within the last three years, such as AALS, national or regional conferences, or other academic conferences.  (The committees are interested in this information because we wish to select and showcase seasoned, as well as fresh, talent.)  Any articles or books that you have published describing the technique(s) you will be demonstrating.

                                      

Send proposals by March 15, 2010 via email (preferably in a Word Document) to Prof. Emily Randon, University of California, Davis School of Law, at elrandon@ucdavis.edu.  Phone number:  530-752-3434.

Questions?:  If you have questions, feel free to contact Emily Randon, Program Chair for the Academic Support Section, Andrew Faltin, Program Chair for the Balance Section, at andrew.faltin@marquette.edu or Catherine Glaze, Student Services Section at cglaze@law.stanford.edu

February 26, 2010 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Call for proposals for AALS Teaching Methods Section for 2011

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

AALS SECTION ON TEACHING METHODS

On behalf of the 2011 Program Committee for the AALS Section on Teaching Methods, we invite you to submit proposals for the 2011 Section Program.  The 2011 AALS Annual Meeting will be held January 4-8, 2011, in San Francisco, CA.  

AALS President H. Reese Hansen has chosen to focus the 2011 Annual Meeting on the Core Values of the Association as reflected in Section 6-1 of the AALS Bylaws.  The Value most directly relating to Teaching Methods is:

iii. a rigorous academic program built upon strong teaching in the context of a dynamic curriculum that is both broad and deep.

The Program Committee encourages proposals that stem from and build upon this value. We encourage and prefer topics that appeal to a wide audience at the AALS conference.  The Committee welcomes both individual proposals and proposals for panel presentations. 

The Program Committee will give preference to presentations designed to engage the program audience, so proposals should contain a detailed explanation of both the substance of the presentation and the interactive methods to be employed. In addition, we would like to highlight talent across a spectrum of law schools and will look for variety in presentations and presenters.

Proposals must include the following information:

1. A title for your presentation.

2. A brief description of the objectives or outcomes of your presentation.

3. A brief description of how your presentation will support your stated objectives or outcomes.

4. The amount of time allocated for your presentation and for the interactive exercise. No single presenter should exceed 45 minutes in total time allowed. Presentations as short as 15 minutes are acceptable.

5. A detailed description of the presentation style (e.g. single speaker, panelists, teaching simulation, etc.).

6. Whether you plan to distribute handouts, use PowerPoint, or employ other technology.

7. A brief biography of the individuals involved in the presentation including school affiliation, title, courses taught, and contact information (include email address and telephone number), and past conference presentations.

8. A brief bibliography of materials relevant to your program topic.

9. Optional: a video of the presenter(s) making the type of presentation envisioned.[1]  This can be done through an electronic file or by posting on an online site (e.g. your website or YouTube).

If your program is accepted, the Program Committee will work with you to maximize the potential of your program.

The deadline for proposals is February 22, 2010.  We anticipate finalizing the selection process by mid March 2010.  Please submit your proposal by email to Kristin Gerdy (gerdyk@law.byu.edu).



[1] While a video is not required, some preference may be given to presenters who provide evidence of their ability to connect with an audience etc.  In lieu of a video, evaluations from previous conference presentations could be submitted.

February 3, 2010 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)