Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

March Madness, Law School Edition

It's March!  Time to create tournament brackets for everything, including law school.  This bracket focuses on four key features of law school: podium courses, skills courses, student organizations, and study skills. What's your favorite part of law school?  Want to make some changes to the bracket?  If so, Download Tournament bracket here.  Have fun and may the best bracket win!  (Kirsha Trychta)   

Tournament bracket

March 6, 2018 in Games, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Picturing Standing in Constitutional Law

Each spring semester, I lead a structured study group primarily focusing on Constitutional Law. For the last few years, I’ve started the semester off with the same “standing” exercise with students, and it’s been a big hit.  I begin by drawing a pictograph on the whiteboard consisting of three big empty rectangles, side-by-side.  I then challenge the students to fill-in the chart with concepts from their standing chapter in a way that makes sense, graphically.  

I encourage them to start by identifying the three main concepts from the standing material. After a few minutes, the students come up with their list: standing (generally), ripeness, and mootness.  If they get stuck, I encourage them to look at their book’s Table of Contents for hints.  I then ask them to place each concept in chronological order.  If I have enough dry erase markers, I’ll write the ripeness material in red, since no case that is deemed unripe will get before the court.  I put the standing material in green indicating that those who have standing are cleared to argue their case before the court, and reserve yellow for the more nuanced category of mootness.

Next, I ask them to identify the test from the casebook that is associated with each principle. This could obviously differ depending on the casebook, but, in my experience, most constitutional law books stick to the same main cases.  I sometimes will write the case name under the principle, but no more.  I don’t write the specific test on the board, but instead give the students time to review and edit the test in their notes or to add the test if it is missing from their notes. 

Finally, I draw an arrow going from “mootness” to “standing,” and ask them what the arrow represents. After a few guesses, I give them a hint if they need it; I tell them to think about the abortion cases that they read.  Eventually someone figures it out, and we have a conversation about the concept that some legal issues are “capable of repetition, yet evading review” which means that although the issue is technically moot, the party may be deemed to have standing anyway. 

I end the exercise by reminding the students that the picture is an overly-simplified version of some very complex constitutional concepts, and that in order to be successful on the exam, they are going to need to continue to build upon what we started in the review session. 

The entire exercise usually takes about 20-30 minutes, leaving enough time in a single review session to also complete a few pre-selected practice multiple-choice questions that focus on the standing principles to help solidify their newly-organized standing rules. (Kirsha Trychta)

Standing pdf jpeg

January 30, 2018 in Games, Study Tips - General, Teaching Tips | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 22, 2017

Holiday Cartoons

Please enjoy these holiday cartoons from the internet. (Kirsha Trychta)

Christmas Gif 1

Christmas Gif 3

 

Christmas Gif 2 

  Christmas gif 5

   Chrsitmas gif 4


December 22, 2017 in Games, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Serve Up a Holiday-Themed Scavenger Hunt

It’s often difficult to keep law students engaged around the holidays when they’re anxious to spend time with friends and family. Below are a few fun ways to promote student engagement by integrating the holidays into your classes.

If you find yourself over-stuffed this week, I do not recommend trying to sue “Thanksgiving, Pilgrims, Mayflower Movers, Pilgrim Pride, Turkey Hill, Black Friday, Corn on the Cob, [or the] Cleveland Indians.” Riches v. Thanksgiving, 2007 WL 4591385 (N.D. Cal 2007). A prisoner who was “offended” by the Thanksgiving holiday tried to do just that, but the court dismissed his claim finding that “[t]o the extent any of these defendants are actual entities that may be sued, they are private organizations that do not act under color of state law, an essential element of a § 1983 action.” And if you want a second helping of prisoner litigation, dish out Professor Abigail Perdue’s suggestion: Karmasu v. Hughes, 654 N.E.2d 179 (Ohio App. 1995) (concerning a prisoner who sued the prison dietician for serving turkey stuffing for Thanksgiving).

In December, consider a Christmas tree or menorah themed case. There are over two thousand cases involving Christmas trees with issues ranging from freedom of religion to the Fair Labor Standards Act in agricultural production. See Mather v. Village of Mundelein, 864 F.2d 1291 (7th Cir. 1989) and U.S. Dept. of Labor v. N.C. Growers Assn., Inc., 377 F.3d 345 (4th Cir. 2004), respectively. For a more technical exploration of the holiday, turn to the U.S. Court of International Trade, which explored whether “14-foot long lengths of wire set with 10 light bulbs … in the form of such objects as fruits, vegetables, hearts, rearing horses, guitars and American flags” should be classified as “lighting sets of a kind used for Christmas trees” or “other electric lamps” within a tariff statute. Primal Lite, Inc. v. U.S., 15 F. Supp. 2d 915 (Ct. Intl. Trade 1998).

Pavlicic v. Vogtsberger (or any of the cases it cites) is an ideal choice around Valentine’s Day for both romantics and cynics alike because the case addresses “the recovery of gifts which [a man] presented to [a woman] in anticipation of a marriage which never saw the bridal veil.” 136 A.2d 127, 128 (Pa. 1957).

Meanwhile, in the spring, opt for an Easter Bunny themed case. If the case need not be published, then I recommend Rogers v. Walgreens, 2017 WL 3263783, where a woman was so startled by a Walgreens’ employee dressed as the Easter Bunny that she fell and injured herself. But if you require a published source, consider People v. Gaither, 173 Cal. App. 2d 662 (1959), which found the defendant guilty of poisoning his ex-wife’s family with chocolate Easter Bunny candies laced with enough arsenic to kill 75 people.

After you select your case, make sure it is sufficiently de-identified for the research exercise.  Here’s a quick “how to”:

  1. Download the opinion from Westlaw or Lexis as a Microsoft Word document.
  2. Delete as much of the identifying information as possible, including the case caption, syllabus, headnotes, and the judge’s name.
  3. Omit any concurring or dissenting opinions, for brevity, if desired.
  4. Substitute any extraordinarily unusual words in the opinion with more commonplace synonyms. Savvy students will simply search for the strange term instead of identifying the actual legal issue.
  5. Use the “find and replace” feature on Word to quickly substitute the parties’ last names with their first names or other designations such as buyer and seller or plaintiff and defendant.
  6. Try to locate the case yourself using traditional Westlaw and Lexis searches. Make sure that the case is findable but does not necessarily immediately reveal itself.
  7. Confirm that the case does not come up in the first few pages of Google search results.

Once the opinion is sufficiently scrubbed, announce the rules of the game and get researching!

For more information on fun holiday-themed research exercises, see the Winter 2016 edition of “The Learning Curve,” a publication of the AALS Section on Academic Support, which is available online at the Law School Academic Success Project.

This post originally appeared on the "Teach Law Better" blog on November 20, 2017.  (Kirsha Trychta)

November 21, 2017 in Games, Teaching Tips | Permalink | Comments (0)