Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Bar Exam: Work Ethic

I teach a bar skills seminar.  The last class of the semester I reserve for a guest speaker - a graduate who took the most recent bar examination.  I chose the person I did this time because of his work ethic I observed during his bar study.  He had one study partner.  They had an express agreement to treat bar review like a job.  They showed up “for work” every day at 8:00 at the law school to study in a room they had reserved for the day.  My guest explained to my class that after checking in with each other they would go to their commercial bar review class. 

At this point, one of my students raised their hand and asked, “I heard that all that the bar review courses provide is a video lecture so why bother showing up to class?”  He had a good answer.  “Because then I was sure I would watch that video.  Coming to class each and every day made me accountable to myself and to my study partner.”  This got the class’ attention.  The students shifted in their seats.  My guest went on to describe how he brought his lunch every day to assure that he ate something healthy and affordable.  During lunch he and his study partner would review their flashcards.  “Tell me everything you know about X.” Then his partner would rattle off all the elements of X and if there were any gaps, they would note them and go over it again.  Once lunch was over, they would return to their reserved room and continue studying until 5:00.  Every day included multiple choice practice tests and essays.  They worked in extra MPTs as well.  My guest told the class that he studied 7-8 hours per day, every day including weekends.  By now you could hear a pin drop in the classroom.  Another student raised her hand and asked, “But, how did you find time to work?”  He answered, “I didn’t.”  After a beat he continued , “I didn’t work, I didn’t go to the gym (he was big into working out), I didn’t do anything but study. I wanted to be able to tell myself that I had done absolutely everything I possibly could.  If I didn’t pass I know it would not be because I didn’t work hard enough.”  So there it was. 

His method for passing the bar was basically working hard.  I felt a twinge of guilt in the moment.  Inside my head I said “Well, that goes against all I’ve been telling students about work life balance for their entire law school careers.”  After more reflection, I think he is onto something.  He looked at bar study from a long range perspective.  Bar review would be 8 weeks long.  He mentally made space in his life to do what he felt needed to be done.  He trusted his instincts.  For him at least, working harder was working smarter. (Bonnie Stepleton)

June 3, 2014 in Bar Exam Preparation | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 26, 2014

One of Many Firsts…The First Day of Bar Prep

We have all experienced many firsts: our first day of school, first car, first date, first victory, first defeat, first kiss, first heartbreak, and first day of law school (maybe not in that order).  Today, you will experience another common first…the first day of bar review (cue Beethoven’s 5th). 

No matter which bar review course you are taking, the first day of bar review is overwhelming.  There are new books, new terms and acronyms, and so much new information.  To say that this first day of bar prep is overwhelming is truly an understatement.  Instead of going under-prepared and leaving in a catatonic state, here are a few suggestions to make this monumental first not only tolerable, but also productive and meaningful:

  • If you have received a box of books or binders, envelopes filled with paperwork, or links via email, open them and read them PRIOR to attending your first bar review class.
  • Start your bar review routine off right: Get a good night’s sleep before your first day, chose a wake-up time that will get you to your class with time to spare, and eat a nutritious breakfast. 
  • Be comfortable, but look presentable.  You do not want someone to think you raided Barry Manilow’s wardrobe.  
  • Pack energy boosting snacks: pick your protein (nuts, yogurt, cheese, hummus, freeze dried ice cream, hardboiled egg…).  You need to stay awake and feel energized. 
  • Bring a notebook to take notes and a hardcopy calendar or planner.  You do not need your computer.
  • Pray, meditate, practice yoga, or adopt another ritual that will help keep you centered.  You must find a way to stay motivated, focused, and positive.  Bar prep will wear on your psyche; thus, you must approach it with a clear plan and an open mind.

Above all, take your first day of bar prep seriously.  If you underestimate the importance of this first day, you may miss valuable information and set yourself on a path toward failure.  Instead, approach the first day in earnest.  Show up physically and mentally and set yourself up for bar exam success. 

LBY

May 26, 2014 in Advice, Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 23, 2014

Ignorance is Bliss

Some students have engaged in early bar preparation prior to law school graduation, while others have chosen to focus their efforts on other tasks during their last year of law school.  While I strongly advocate for the notion of “the earlier the better” for bar prep, many decide to live solely in the present and avoid the bar exam until it is imminent.  "Ignorance is bliss"after all. 

This sentiment brings to mind Thomas Gray’s poem Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College, a personal  reflection on the bliss of youth and the worries and trials that lie ahead in adulthood.  Law school is by no means paradise, but it invokes “wild wit, invention ever-new” much more than preparing for the bar exam.  Unfortunately, preparing for the bar exam feels much more like "comfortless despair." 

Thus, I encourage students to take time now at the close of their legal education to reflect on their successes, their challenges, and the fun times that they had as a law student.  This provides closure to their law school experience and helps invigorate their ambition to succeed on the bar exam. And, since the "folly" of bar review will be upon them next week, I hope they have one last weekend of pure, unrestrained bliss.

LBY

May 23, 2014 in Advice, Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Encouragement & Inspiration | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

New Bar Exam Section -- Interpretive Dance

The National Conference of Bar Examiners announced last Thursday that it will be adding a new section to the Multistate Bar Exam -- Interpretive Dance.  

The new section will add one hour to the current bar exam, and take place on the same day as the MEE and MPT.  Students will be given a topic from the current list of MBE subjects (for example, "The Rule Against Perpetuities") and will then have 40 minutes to choreograph an appropriate dance "displaying the student's understanding and familiarity with the relevant issues and analysis" and "showing the student's aptitude in formulating the relevant rule of law in logical and complete ways."  The students will be given six potential music choices:  "Les toreadors from Carmen Suite No. 1" by Georges Bizet, "Ride of the Valkyries from Die Walkure" by Richard Wagner, "Bugler's Holiday" by Leroy Anderson, "Rhapsody in Blue" by George Gershwin, "A Love Supreme" by John Coltrane, and "Baby Got Back" by Sir Mix-A-Lot.  The dance should take no longer than 10 minutes.    

At South Carolina, we will be instituting a new class in response to the change, which will include basic choreography to make sure the students fulfill the section's mandate of "choreography appropriate to the legal issue at hand."  The class will largely focus on Balanchine and Graham, although we will also look at Tharp and Cyrus as potential role models. 

We will also be instituting daily group sit-ups because of the importance of core strength.

(Alex Ruskell) 

April 1, 2014 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Preparing for the Multistate Professional Responsiblity Exam

For many 2 and 3Ls the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) is right around the corner.  The MPRE is a multiple choice exam consisting of 60 questions offered three times each year.  The MPRE is a required licensing test for all states except Maryland and Wisconsin.  The American Bar Association (ABA) Model Rules of Professional Conduct, the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct, and control­ling constitutional decisions and generally accepted principles established in leading federal and state cases and in procedural and evidentiary rules are tested on the MPRE.  Commercial bar companies have condensed these rules in their review lectures.  And, fortunately, most of these companies offer free MPRE courses and materials for students.

Although these free resources are available, many students do not take advantage of them.  Instead, they underestimate the difficulty of the MPRE and sometimes take the exam without even studying.  While the MPRE is not as challenging as the Multistate Bar Exam, it is still a high stakes standardized test that requires concerted effort in order to reach a passing score.  A careful study of the rules sets a firm foundation for test day.  Additionally, as with any test, completing practice questions will hone an examinees test taking ability and will help assess their performance.  The commercial bar courses offer ample practice questions for this purpose.  The National Conference of Bar Examiners also offers for purchase one Online Practice Exam (OPE) for the MPRE.  

Here are a few other things to keep in mind as you prepare for the MPRE:

  • Arrive on time, but not too early.  Once you have been checked in by the proctors in the testing room, you are not allowed to leave prior to start time.  If you arrive too early, you are stuck waiting in a room full of overly anxious applicants and an assortment of #2 pencils.
  • You cannot chew gum during the exam (or have other food or drinks).  I really wanted my gum, but they made me throw it away.
  • You cannot wear earplugs!  Why?  I do not know the answer.  This is cruel and unusual.
  • You are able to leave the room during the test, but depending on your testing site that may not be a great idea.  At my testing site, the bathroom was two flights of stairs from the testing room.  (Even though I wanted to take a restroom break, I did not want to sacrifice the time.)  Extra time is not given for restroom breaks.
  • You cannot bring anything into the testing room- no cellphones, no bags, no books... Bring your pencils, your ID, your admission ticket, (photo- see below) and your knowledge of PR.
  • Don't forget to bring a current passport-type photo on exam day.  Think about getting this out of the way early.
  • Leave your watch at home.  Watches are not allowed at the test center.  Electronic devices of any kind are not allowed either.
  • As with the bar exam, wear comfortable layers.  The temperature of the room may be too hot or too cold and may fluctuate during the course of your test. 

Above all, do not minimize the effort needed to prepare for the MPRE.  Last minute cramming may lead to regret.  Scores are posted approximately five weeks after the test.  Good luck to everyone taking the MPRE!

(Lisa Young)

 

March 12, 2014 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Post Bar Exam Blues

Now that the celebrations and champagne toasts have faded, bar examinees may feel lost, deflated, or generally lacking direction.  This state of mind is what I refer to as the "Post Bar Exam Blues."  As with other challenging life transitions, processing their bar exam experience will take time.  They have been on a roller coaster ride with extreme highs and lows for the last eight weeks.  Once the ride ends, it is hard to remember who you were before you got on.   

In order to best move through this period, I suggest that students first reflect on their experience.  Sharing their feelings with someone they trust can help them work through their fears, their doubts, and acknowledge the incredible accomplishment of getting through this test.  Writing out their feelings is also helpful.  Once they get these emotions out into the universe, it is easier for them to put the experience behind them and avoid replaying it over and over again in their mind.

Results generally take several months to be released.  Thus, once they have the opportunity to reflect on their experience, it is best to redirect them toward something positive and productive.  Second guessing their performance, or holding their breath until results are posted is fruitless.  Instead, having them create a list of current projects or ways to use their free time can help them see that there is life outside of bar review.  Also, jumping head first into a new job or a job search can help remind them why they wanted to become a lawyer.  Ultimately, getting them to understand that they are not defined by their MBE score will help them remedy their blues.

(lby)

March 6, 2014 in Advice, Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

UCC Article 3 & 4, No More

Is the check a negotiable instrument?  Is the party a holder in due course?  Was the check properly payable? These are frequent questions bar students draft as they struggle through answering Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Article 3 & 4 bar essays.  However, these struggles appear to be over for many.  According to the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE), effective with the February 2015 bar exam, Negotiable Instruments (Uniform Commercial Code Article 3 and the excerpts of Article 4, Bank Collections) will no longer be tested on the Multistate Essay Examination (MEE). 

This news should come as a relief to future bar exam applicants and Academic Support Professors as well.  UCC 3 & 4 is an area that students rarely study in law school.  They approach bar review with little (if any) knowledge of negotiable instruments and bank deposits and collections.  The unfamiliar language coupled with the lack of practicality make this area difficult for students to internalize.  Some students may have never even written a check!  Additionally, many states that do not use the MEE, no longer test UCC 3 & 4.  Thus, the decision to remove UCC 3 & 4 from the list of subjects tested on the MEE seems timely and appropriate.

This news also made me wonder how decisions like this are made.  For example, are there are other subjects that should also be eliminated from or added to the list of subjects tested on the MEE?  What is the process by which these decisions are made?  Additionally, NCBE has expressed interest in adding more subjects to the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE).   Should all of the current MEE subjects also be tested on the MBE?  Is this truly necessary for assessing competency?  Or, is this a bar that will negatively impact access to the profession?

LBY

March 5, 2014 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

How do you prepare part-time students for the bar exam?

Two weeks ago, I held a workshop about the bar exam for all 2L students. UMass has a significant part-time program, and the number-one concern of part-time students was "How do I study if I can't take time off from my job?" I stressed to all students that studying for the bar exam is a full-time job, and it takes a minimum of 800 hours of study time to succeed on the bar exam (more if a student is taking the California bar exam). Unlike law school, where part-time students have a reduced course load so they can balance work, family, and school, there is no "reduced study load" available for the bar exam. Reduced study time results in failure, and the bar exam is just too expensive to fail. I spoke to the students about spreading their study hours over a longer period of time, and taking the February, not the July, bar exam. I spoke to students about starting bar prep much earlier, so they can get all the study time in, if they must take the July bar. 

I think this is a question we should revisit at an upcoming ASP conference. I know there is innovative, interesting programs that prepare part-time students for the bar exam, and I would love to see more information on how we can better prepare part-time students who cannot take time off the job for the bar exam. 

(RCF)

November 5, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 31, 2013

To Scare or Not to Scare…the Bar Exam

With Halloween upon us, I started thinking about all things frightening.  While at this time of the year ghosts and ghouls are the first to come to mind, the bar exam is a close second.  The bar exam is the single most grueling test of an individual’s resilience and stamina.  While it is a test of legal knowledge, it goes far beyond just knowing the black letter law.

The bar exam is a test of personal strength, courage, and endurance.  Applicants are tested in a variety of ways on subjects both familiar and unfamiliar in a severely time limited environment.  It is a scary endeavor. 

Oftentimes, Law School Deans, Administrators, and even Professors want to mask the bar exam for 1Ls to conceal the utter horror.  They want 1Ls to acclimate to their legal education without the haze of the bar exam impeding their focus.  Bar review companies are even forbidden on campus so as not to disrupt a student’s transition to law school.

These practices make me wonder.  Should we scare our students into studying for the bar?  If yes, should we instill this fear as early as 1L year?  While I agree that 1Ls have more pressing fears to overcome than the bar exam, I also think it is a disservice to ignore the intensity and sheer hell that awaits them.  If I walk into a theater expecting to see a romantic comedy and end up seeing Jason in a hockey mask with a bloody hatchet, my expectations are quashed and I may not know how to react.  (I had to...it is Halloween.) 

Training students on how to prepare in advance is part of our duty as legal educators.  Law students need help learning how to prepare for class, how to prepare their study aids, and how to prepare for their exams.  Preparing 1Ls for the bar is also necessary.  However, it does not look like full fledge bar prep or even like training given to a 3L. 

Instead, 1Ls need notice. They need to know what awaits them and what (if anything) they should be doing before they reach their final year of law school.  Here are a few considerations that should be conveyed to 1Ls.

  • Think about where you want to practice law.  There may be jurisdictional requirements specific to that state.
  • Ask questions!  Your first year courses are bar tested.  If you slip by without having a good understanding of the concepts, you will also be lost during your bar preparation. Seek out the answers to your questions as early as possible so that you can get the academic assistance that you need.
  • Begin thinking about your 2L and 3 L years and your course selection.  Consider the subjects that are bar tested and the subjects that interest you most.  Try to balance your course load between these interests.
  • Start planning for the financial impact of the bar exam.  Applying for the bar exam is costly and bar exam review courses are as well.  Additionally, many students fail to consider the cost of taking time off and paying for incidentals like travel and accommodations while taking the bar exam.  Begin saving early!
  • Research commercial bar preparation offerings.  Many of the bar review companies offer resources for 1L and upper division students for free or a minimal charge.  Take advantage of these resources as a 1L!

In other words, let's not "Freddy Krueger" scare them...maybe just add a little Hitchcock anxiety and suspense.

(Lisa Young)

October 31, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

A Crystal Ball for Bar Passage?

I want to give a hat tip to Paul L. Caron, Professor of Law at Pepperdine and owner of Law Professor Blogs, for the following link that might be of interest to our readers. http://witnesseth.typepad.com/blog/2013/08/what-are-my-chances-of-passing-the-bar.html

While I think it is risky to rely on calculators to assess bar passage probability as their results only factor in quantitative data, some students may find this calculator a useful resource for determining where to take the bar exam.  Since many of us in Academic Support realize that qualitative data plays a huge role in bar success, the results from this "bar passage calculator" are not perfect.  Additionally, if a student is told that their bar passage odds are low, they may make that prediction a reality.  However, if a student is open to moving to a jurisdiction where their bar passage odds may increase based on the numbers, this calculator could be beneficial.  My advice is to check it out and think about the pros and cons before distributing it widely to your students.

Lisa Young

October 8, 2013 in Advice, Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Preparing for Bar Exam Results

Bar Results are released at different times in each jurisdiction.  This summer, Washington State administered the Uniform Bar Exam for the first time.  In addition to many changes to the exam format, the results release date is changing as well.  The bar exam results in WA are being released earlier- one month earlier!  It is time to prepare for the results.

Grads often go into hibernation right after the bar exam.  They are busy getting their lives back, traveling, getting married, and catching up on their sleep.  As they begin to establish new routines distance grows between the bar exam and their current existence.  Eventually, they are able to move beyond thinking about their performance on the bar exam.

However, as soon as talk of the impending results begins to surface (likely through Facebook), grads are jolted back to that uncomfortable state of limbo.  During the weeks before the release of results, I start receiving emails, phone calls, and visits from grads who are calling on me for support or to ask questions about the delivery of their results.  While I did everything possible to help them pass the bar exam, I now have no control over the fate of their results.  I find myself in a purgatory of sorts.  I, like our grads, am waiting with baited breath for the results. 

With less than a week before the release of bar results, I offer these suggestions to grads who are feeling anxious. 

  • The bar exam is only a test.  I know this is easy for me to say when I have already passed the exam.  But, this test is only a snapshot in a lifetime filled with many rewarding and joyous occasions. 
  • The bar exam does not define who you are.  (As stated above, the bar is only a test.)  Your intelligence and character are not judged by a standardized test taken over a two day period.  You have a lifetime to create memories, build a career, and show the world who you are.
  • Focus on the things that matter most in your life.  Having gratitude for the many wonderful gifts you enjoy in your life can turn a fretful time into one of reflection and personal growth.  Sit down and make a list of what matters to you most and use that list to stay centered through the days (and hours) leading up to the release of your bar results.
  • Make a plan for when you receive your results.  Do you want to be with your friends or loved ones?  Or, would you rather receive your results by yourself?  Either way, you should make a plan so you can be prepared when the results are released.  If your results are not favorable, you should have a support system in place to help you process your disappointment and lift your spirits.  If you pass, you will want someone with you to celebrate.  I hope all of  you will be celebrating!

Lisa Young

September 10, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 6, 2013

Should 1Ls think about the bar exam?

Two weeks ago we held our Student Services Fair and on behalf of the Bar Studies Program I was invited to participate.  The first floor of the law school was lined with rows of tables nicely dressed with red and black covers (our school colors of course).  Eager, newly minted 1Ls meandered through the crowd stopping to secure swag and informational handouts from the myriad of vendors and student services teams. 

As students approach my table labeled with a “Bar Studies Program” placard, their starry-eye gaze quickly faded.  Some completely ignored me and continued to walk past the table to quickly grab a stainless steel water bottle with attached carabiner (because law school is a lot like mountaineering but I will save that for another post).  However, a few brave souls stopped to ask a question or flip through the books and brochures that I had on display.

From the fearless few, the most frequent question asked was, “I do not have to think about the bar exam yet, right?”  Even though this sounded more like a statement than a question, I ventured to answer.  While I did not want to completely terrify them, especially before classes even started, I also wanted to seize this opportunity.   Thus, I proceeded cautiously. 

From my point of view, bar preparation begins on the first day of orientation (possibly even earlier).  Therefore, hopefully without scaring them to death, I discussed a few ideas regarding the bar exam that they should consider as they embark on their legal education.  I have highlighted a few here.

Bar Examination Considerations for 1Ls:

  • Think about where you want to practice law:  It may seem too early to consider where you want to establish yourself as an attorney, but 1Ls should at least consider where they would like to live and practice as they begin their legal education journey.
  • Find out jurisdictional requirements:  Once you have chosen the jurisdiction in which you would like to practice or narrowed down the jurisdictions, it is a good idea to learn about the licensing requirements in that jurisdiction.
  • Pro Bono Requirements:  States may begin to require pro bono service for bar applicants.  For example, New York State recently adopted a pro bono service requirement.  Other states may soon follow suit...stay tuned.  Either way, volunteering your time by doing pro bono work is win- win.
  • Register with the bar association:  Some states require law student registration or require a first year law student’s exam to be completed.  For example, California requires CA law students to register with the State Bar within 90 days after beginning law school.
  • Build the foundation for bar review: Keep in mind that everything you learn in your first year of law school will be tested on the bar exam.  Most students just try to stay afloat long enough to get through their 1L exams.  However, I encourage students to think about how to study, how to prepare for exams, and, most importantly, how to store information into their long term memory.  The legal concepts and doctrines that they learn during their first year will be more readily accessible to them during bar prep if they have a solid understanding of them during their 1L year.
  • Learn about the bar review course offerings:  Once students have determined where they plan to practice, they can learn about the bar review course offerings in that jurisdiction.  Registering for a bar review course during 1L year will allow students to take advantage of their law school programs such as lectures, exam review materials, and interactive software programs.  Additionally, students will typically save money if they register for a bar review course during their first year.
  • Plan financially for the bar exam:  Create a budget for yourself during law school that reserves funds for your bar review expenses.  In your expense calculations, make sure you include your bar review course fee, your bar exam application fees, MPRE registration fees, hotel and transportation fees during the administration of the bar exam, and living expenses while studying for the bar exam.

In essence, 1Ls, it is never too soon to prepare for the bar.

     Lisa Young

 

 

 

September 6, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Resource for MBE Practice

Many of you know that the National Conference of Bar Examiners write the multiple choice questions that are on the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE).  However, you may not realize that the NCBE publishes three MBE practice tests, Online Practice Exams (OPE), for purchase in their online store.  Each OPE consists of 100 mixed subject questions that have been taken from recent MBEs.  In addition to more MBE practice, these tests include an explanation as to why the incorrect answers are incorrect.*  This feature helps students assess their performance and improve their understanding of the law.

In many jurisdictions, including all of the Uniform Bar Exam jurisdictions, the written scores are scaled to the MBE and are weighed heavier than each of the written components.  Thus, having a solid  MBE score will help applicants increase their chances of passing the bar exam.  While most, if not all, of the bar review companies provide ample MBE practice questions for bar students, the OPEs can still be a great addition to their study plan. 

First, the questions on the OPE are actual questions from past Multistate Bar Exams.  Therefore, they illustrate a sampling of the legal issues that could be tested on a future bar exam.  Next, they are written in the exact style as the actual MBE questions.  This is significant because answering MBE questions requires not only content knowledge but also critical thinking and logical reasoning skills. 

Understanding the testing format on the bar is just as important as knowing and understanding the law.  Higher order multiple choice questions are more difficult to answer because they go beyond mere knowledge and comprehension.  They incorporate evaluation, synthesis, analysis, and application.**  That is why typically the mean MBE scaled score is 139-143 (which roughly equates to a raw score of 115-123 out of a possible 200).  Essentially, applicants need to get approximately 60% of the answers correct to achieve a passing MBE score.

I have encouraged students who need additional MBE practice to purchase the OPEs.  They have found this resource to be incredibly helpful.  They receive a score report upon completion and are able to repeat the test after they have a chance to review their initial answers and the explanations. 

 *National Conference of Bar Examiners at ncbex.org

**See Bloom's taxonomy

LBY

 

July 24, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Memorization: The Final Week of Bar Prep

During the final week of bar prep, memorization is paramount.  Overlearning the law is the best way to conquer the bar exam.  MBE success requires quick recollection and MEE success requires depth of knowledge- both of which rely on memorization.

When studying this week, above all, try to understand your learning preference(s).  Listening to your inner voice and sticking with what works best for you is the best way to be successful with your memorization.  However, if you are still looking for other ways to memorize, here are a few ideas:

  • Find creative ways to interact with the material and keep it fresh.
  • Use a study partner or significant other to test you on your knowledge with flashcards or just talk out a subject together.
  • Create tables, flowcharts, or diagrams to illustrate difficult rules or concepts.  Even drawing pictures can help you create a memorable visual.
  • Use other memory devices such as: flash cards, sticky notes, white boards, or a tape recorder. 
  • Create mnemonics that have meaning to you or use ones that have been created by your bar prep.
  • Explain the main points of a subject or essay to someone else (a family member, friend, or roommate).  Or, talk to yourself- it's ok, you are studying for the bar!
  • Color code, use different fonts, or hand-write rules over and over in order to individualize the material and make it more memorable.
  • Read your lecture notes or outline/study-aid aloud, record it, play it back and listen to it.
  • Study while you move- walk, ride a bike, bounce on an exercise ball, or use an elliptical. 

Good luck on your memorization this week!

LBY

July 23, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams, Exams - Studying, Learning Styles, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head

It rained steadily in West Texas for three different days last week!  Hooray - a dent in the drought for our gardeners and cotton growers.  Lubbock even made the national Weather Channel coverage - usually only happens when we deal with sky-reddening massive dust storms.  Lots of folks had forgotten the routines to deal with rain and left their umbrellas, rain hats, or raincoats home on the first day. 

Why this title and mention of rain?  I am talking to a fair number of bar studiers and summer school students who are feeling as though it is stormy weather for them under a deluge of material.  Here are some of the reasons:

  • The bar exam dates are drawing perilously close.
  • Bar studiers are concerned about their scores on practice questions.
  • For many bar studiers, there is still too much to learn in what seems too little time.
  • Summer school students are beginning to realize how fast a 5-week summer session goes by.
  • Many summer school students are juggling part-time jobs with studies and feeling stretched too thin.
  • Students with spouses, children, significant others, elderly parents, or other responsibilities beyond school are pulled in multiple directions.

When summer school students and bar studiers get focused on the negative deluge instead of grabbing their umbrellas, they can stress themselves out and become overwhelmed.  Here are some tips to remember that the apparent deluge is really just a bunch of individual raindrops: 

  • Prioritize the tasks that need to be done instead of considering everything as equal.
  • Decide how each task can be completed for the wisest use of time and the most results.
  • Focus on one small task at a time and then move on to the next rather than getting caught up in the overview of everything.
  • Remember that the goal is to learn from one's mistakes on practice questions - the learning avoids a mindless repetition of mistakes.
  • Give credit for what has been learned well, is going right, and has pulled together to balance out one's negativity.
  • Stop obsessing over the "should haves" or "could haves" - what is done (or not done) cannot be changed; focus on what can still be controlled now.     
  • Ask family and friends for patience, encouragement, and help with non-study tasks that would usually be shared (cooking, cleaning, child care).
  • Get on a regular sleep schedule of at least 7-8 hours of sleep per night - life looks a lot less stormy when one is well-rested.
  • If work is also being juggled, consider whether hours can be reduced for the rest of the summer session. 

Whether the bar exam is the stressor or summer school, realize that perfection is not needed.  One needs to do the best one can under one's circumstances.  Persevere and do not get psyched out and defeated.  (Amy Jarmon) 

 

July 21, 2013 in Bar Exam Preparation, Stress & Anxiety, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 15, 2013

MBE: Review is the Key

The most important aspect of practicing Multistate Bar Exam (MBE) questions happens after taking the practice questions not during.  Reviewing your answers after taking the practice tests is crucial to success.  No matter how many questions you can access, it is not about the quantity of questions you complete.  Instead, you should focus on quality.  By incorporating review into your MBE practice you will figure out what you know and what you don’t know in addition to diagnosing common traps. 

For the next set of practice MBEs you complete, remember to schedule enough time to review your answers.  Read through the answer choices and the answer explanations.  Whether right or wrong, determine why you selected your answer.  You need to learn how to remedy your errors and replicate your successes. 

 

Lisa Young

July 15, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Successful Bar Exam Writing Practice

Writing style and format is critical to successful bar exam performance.  Do not fall into the trap of only memorizing the law.  You must focus on your approach and your writing techniques in order to reach a passing score on the Multistate Essays and the Multistate Performance Test.  Here are a few ways to ensure that you will achieve passing scores:

  • Carefully read the fact pattern, call lines, and file/library.  Take your time!
  • Organize your thoughts before you begin writing.  Use your scratch paper!
  • Use only the amount of time allowed for each essay or PT task. Time your practice! 
  • Use an organizational model like IRAC or CRAC.  Use it for every issue and sub-issue!
  • Make your answer easy to read.  Use short concise sentences and paragraphs!
  • Remember to review what you have written.  Become the grader!
  • Do not get frustrated by your mistakes, get motivated and learn from them!
  • Keep practicing…practice equals passing!

 

Lisa Young

July 9, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Top 4 Ways to Spend the 4th...While Studying for the Bar

During bar prep, life for bar applicants is essentially consumed with studying for the bar exam and not much else.  It is eat, sleep, and breath bar prep.  However, balance, especially in times like these, is essential to maintaining health and emotional stability.  In light of the need for balance, I have created a list of the top 4 ways to spend the 4th (while studying for the bar exam).

4. Sleep:  Everyone is sleep deprived while studying for the bar exam.  Lecture schedules dictate wake up, and study schedules often require burning the midnight oil.  But, as we all know, brain research confirms that our memory improves with sleep.  Sleep also makes us less grumpy and give us stamina to sustain long days of studying.  Thus, sleep until noon on the 4th or take a long midsummer's nap...perhaps on a hammock or in a shady spot on the beach.  You will feel recharged as you venture into the final weeks of bar prep and will repay some of your sleep debt. 

3. Blow off Steam:  Now, don't go crazy with this one.  What I mean to say, is have some fun!  Do something that epitomizes summer fun (for you).  Waterski, go for a hike, play a tennis match, garden, or head to a park with friends for a game of Ultimate Frisbee (this is what I will be doing).  Try to fill your spirit so that you will feel refreshed.  Find moments of joy that will sustain you during the long study hours that will encompass your life in the weeks ahead.

2. Indulge:  Now, if you did not find #4 and #3 indulgent enough, I have added "Indulge" on its own.  When I think of the 4th, I think about food...so maybe this is a good time for you to go out for brunch with your friends, to fire up your smoker for some slow cooked ribs, or bake a berry pie with those beautiful berries cropping up at the farmer's market.  Make time to indulge in things that make you happy and try to nourish yourself with fun and delicious foods.   

1. Spend time with Friends and Family:  This is a no-brainer.  Our relationships with our family and friends help us maintain balance and help support us when times are tough.  Studying for the bar exam is one of those times.  Take the 4th as a day to be with your support system and to renew the bonds you have with your family and friends.  This time together will rejuvenate your connections and fill your spirit.

Happy Fourth of July!

Lisa Young

 

July 2, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, June 28, 2013

Making Mistakes

One of the most difficult aspects (I admit there are many) of bar review, is allowing yourself to make mistakes.  Many of us hate being wrong and we try to avoid failure at all costs.  However, making mistakes is the only way that you will fully understand what you know and what you don’t yet know when studying for the bar exam.  I actually begin each semester by telling my students that I expect and want them to make a lot of mistakes.  This especially rings true when they are studying for the bar.   

Instead of being in denial about their mistakes, they should abandon their perfectionist tendencies and force themselves to own up to their missteps.  Much like when we are children and told to learn from our mistakes, bar students need to embrace their mistakes and find lessons within them.  Deeper learning will occur if students focus on improving their knowledge instead of being hung up on a score.

For example, many students who are studying for the MBE have difficulty reaching passing scores on their early practice tests.  Instead of throwing in the towel, I suggest that they keep going.  Continued practice and self-evaluation will help their scores improve. 

After assessing their progress on their practice questions, students should begin to diagnose their mistakes.  In order to determine their weaknesses, they can ask themselves a series of questions to help them pinpoint areas to improve upon.  Are they reading the facts too quickly?  Did they misinterpret the law?  Did they have an inadequate grasp of the legal concepts being tested?  Did they get seduced by the seducer?  If yes, why did they get seduced?  Did they incorrectly identify the central issue? 

In asking questions such as these, students are reflecting on their learning.  Diagnosing their mistakes is the most important step in the learning process.  Their progress will become apparent and they will gain confidence in the process.  Therefore, I encourage you and your students to keep making mistakes! 

June 28, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Top Five Things To Do Before Bar Prep:

5.            Clean your house/apartment/living space.  Create a positive and productive work environment.  Think about where you will study and how you can ensure that it suits your needs for bar review.  Also, this may be the last time you have time to clean until August, so think about doing a deep clean and clear the clutter. Having a tidy work and living space will positively impact your studying.

4.            Calendar!  Print a blank summer calendar. (I like to see it on paper, but you can also use an online program.)  Put all essential items on your calendar: bar review classes, exercise, child /elder care responsibilities, etc…  Try to structure each day in order to create a realistic routine.  Free time should also be on your calendar: meals, sleep, downtime, recharging activities, etc… Fill each hour of the day with either bar study/practice or a free-time activity.  Doing this will help you to avoid procrastination and will help you use your time effectively during bar prep.

3.            Talk to your family and friends.  Show them your summer plan (and calendar).  Better yet, send them copies of your calendar.  Offer ways for them to provide you support (dinner, encouraging emails, childcare).  Informing your significant others will keep them from hindering your success this summer and will provide you with a strong support system.  You will need it!

2.            Do something fun, spontaneous, and slightly wacky.  Why?  Since you will not have the luxury of being spontaneous this summer during your bar prep, having a madcap adventure can help satiate that desire until August.  Nothing too crazy…but something memorable!  (Seattle ideas:  ride the wheel at sunset; go kayaking on Lake Union; stay out really late and then sleep in until noon; take a day hike with friends; ride the train to Portland to see the Rose Festival firework show; or check out a local concert, art show, or museum.)  Take pictures and post them near your study space or on your fridge.  These memories will help get through the long monotonous days of summer bar study.

1.            Take time to reflect.  Celebrate the end of your law school journey and reflect on how far you have come in the last three years.  Write down your many successes and what you have learned about yourself and your learning style.  Understanding what worked for you in law school and what challenged you will benefit you during your bar prep.  And, reflecting on your past will help you transition to bar prep with a renewed sense of purpose and inner strength.  You can pass the bar exam- believing in yourself is the first step!

Lisa Young

May 21, 2013 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)