Friday, October 17, 2014

Welcome Mary Ann Becker to the ASP Community

Becker

Please welcome Mary Ann Becker!  Mary Ann is the Associate Director of Writing Programs and Academic Support at Loyola Unviersity Chicago School of Law.  Thank you to Jennifer Brendel, the Director, for providing more information on Mary Ann:

Before joining Loyola’s faculty as the Associate Director of Writing Programs and Academic Support, Mary Ann Becker taught legal research and writing to first, second, and third year students at DePaul University College of Law for seven years.  She had also acted as the interim assistant director of the legal writing program at DePaul and was a member of Board of Editors for The Second Draft.  Before teaching, she worked as a litigation attorney in Chicago.  She graduated from Northwestern University with a B.A. in French language and literature and she earned her J.D. from DePaul University.  Though new to academic support, she will be presenting an article she wrote at Duquesne’s December 6 conference, Teaching the Academically Underprepared Law Student, and she looks forward to meeting many of you soon!

Mary Ann's faculty profile can be found here: Mary Ann Becker.  Please welcome her when you see her at a conference or workshop.

October 17, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 3, 2014

Welcome Charles Splawn to ASP Work

Splawn

Please welcome Charles "Chuck" Splawn as Academic and Bar Support Skills Instructor at Elon University School of Law. Chuck began his position in March 2014.  Here is some background information from Antonette Barilla, Director of Academic and Bar Support/Assistant Professor at Elon, to help you get to know him:

Charles Splawn was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in North Carolina. He is married to his lovely wife Allison, 29 years and counting.  He is a graduate of Wake Forest University School of Law and his law career included general private practice, litigation management as in-house counsel for an insurance company, and corporate law involving mergers & acquisitions. 

In 2001 he fulfilled a lifelong dream of becoming a teacher by joining the faculty of the Legal Studies Department at Horry-Georgetown Technical College (HGTC), in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  He was selected Professor of the Year at HGTC in May 2006 and served as President of Faculty Assembly at HGTC for the 2007-2008 Academic Year.  He is very excited to begin the next phase of his career by returning to the law school environment generally and by becoming part of the Elon Law family specifically.

Please make Chuck feel welcomed when you see him at a conference or workshop!

 

 

 

October 3, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 19, 2014

Welcome Kandace Kukas to Western New England School of Law

Kandace-kukas

Please welcome Kandace Kukas to ASP work at Western New England.  Her faculty profile can be found on the faculty page at WNE at Faculty Profiles WNE - Kandace Kukas.  Here is a short bio for her:

Kandace Kukas is the new Assistant Dean and Director of Bar Admission Programs at Western New England University School of Law in Springfield, Massachusetts.  Kandace started July 1st and jumped right in to working with the class of 2014.  She is responsible for creating a comprehensive bar admission program working with the entire School of Law community.  For the previous 17 years she worked in test preparation and the last 9 in bar review. 

When you see Kandace at a workshop or conference, please give her a warm welcome to our ASP community.  (Amy Jarmon)

 

September 19, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Welcome Michelle Buck to full-time ASP work!

MercerLawHeadShotMini

Please welcome Michelle Buck as the new full-time Assistant Director of Academic Success and Student Affairs at Mercer Law!  When you see Michelle at workshops or conferences, please give her a friendly ASP congratulations.  Here is some information about Michelle:

Michelle's responsibilities include assisting the Director of Academic Success with weekly Academic Success programming for first-year students, helping with the Bar Review for Credit course for third-year students in the spring, and working with the Assistant Dean of Students on various student affairs projects.  Last year she worked in a similar role, as the Assistant Director of Academic Success, on a part-time basis.  Michelle earned her law degree from Temple University in 2009 and is licensed to practice law in Illinois and Georgia.  She has previous legal experience in low-income family law.  Outside of work she enjoys spending time with my family, especially her two daughters, Audrey (3) and Lucy (1).

We are delighted to have Michelle join us as a full-time ASP'er!  (Amy Jarmon)

September 13, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 12, 2014

Welcome Marsha Griggs to our ASP community!

Griggs

Marsha Griggs has joined the ASP professional community as Assistant Dean for Academic Support and Bar Readiness at Texas Southern University - Thurgood Marshall School of Law.  Please introduce yourselves to Marsha as you meet her at workshops and conferences.  Here is some information about Marsha:

Prior to joining the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Marsha served on the faculty at Collin College and chaired the Business Administration and Paralegal Studies departments. Marsha graduated from Notre Dame Law School and earned her Bachelor of Science Degree at Northwestern University.  Additionally, Marsha has received a Masters degree in Public Policy and is in pursuit of her doctorate in Public Policy and Political Economy.  Marsha is licensed in Colorado and Texas and her practice areas are commercial and civil litigation. Personally, Marsha is an avid college football fan and a recurring and often unintentional foster for rescue dogs of various breeds. She and her hair are getting acclimated to the muggy humid Houston weather since relocating in February.

Please make Marsha welcome to ASP work! (Amy Jarmon)

 

September 12, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 29, 2014

Are you new to Academic Support or Bar Prep work? Have you moved schools?

At the beginning of each academic semester, we like to introduce ASP or bar professionals who are new to their law schools or who have changed locations?  We want to post an academic spotlight about you so that you are introduced to the community of readers if you are new and so readers know your news if you have moved to a different law school.

If you would like for us to post an academic spotlight about you (or a colleague at your school who is too shy to send us something), please send the following information to Amy Jarmon at amy.jarmon@ttu.edu.  I will be doing posts throughout September and early October.

Here is what I need from you for a spotlight post:

  1. A small jpeg photo.
  2. Your full name, title, and law school information.
  3. 100 - 200 words telling us about yourself: when you started your job, what you were doing before your position, your JD school, your legal practice experience/specialties, your interests professionally and personally.
  4. A link to your faculty/staff profile on your law school web pages if one exists.

We look forward to welcoming you to our terrific community of colleagues and updating folks on your careers.  (Amy Jarmon)

August 29, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 2, 2014

The Importance of Writing for Long-Term ASPer's

My article is due to go out to law reviews on Friday. I have learned many, many things while writing the article,  but the most important lesson learned is about teaching. Specifically, the process of submitting my piece to outside reviewers has given me renewed insight into what our students experience when they receive feedback. I know the research on students and feedback. However, it is completely different to experience getting feedback. If you have been in ASP for a while, you probably haven't received feedback since law school. Getting feedback is very tough. To write something, to spend weeks and months preparing, and then weeks and months writing, is emotionally draining and personally exhausting. You cannot help but feel that your admittedly flawed, incomplete article is a part of yourself. But then you have to let it go out to reviewers. If you are lucky, you will have tough, critical reviewers who are willing to tell you everything that is wrong with the piece, so that you can make it better before the submission process. I have been blessed with some really tough reviewers, and my piece is immeasurably better because they spent hours telling me just what is wrong with my flawed, incomplete article. I am confident that what goes out on Friday morning is no longer flawed or incomplete, but a fully-realized articulation of a problem. And it is better, stronger, and complete because of the feedback I received from outside reviewers.

The process of receiving feedback has reminded me how tough it is on our students. They spend all semester struggling with the material, and then they are judged on their learning just once or twice a semester. They cannot help but feel like they are being personally judged, evaluated, and measured. Part of our job is to help our students see that critical feedback is not meant to measure  failures and self-worth, but to show them how to be stronger, better, and smarter.   It is a part of the "invisible curriculum" of law schools (to use a Carnegie term) that criticism will produce stronger lawyers. We need to make that visible to students; we need to explain that we give them critical feedback because we believe they can be smarter, stronger, better thinkers and writers.

If you are a long-term ASPer, try writing an article for a law review. It may not help you in your professional evaluations, you may not need it for tenure, but you should do it because it will make you a better teacher. Reading about feedback is not the same as receiving feedback. Write because it will help you understand your students.

RCF

August 2, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight, Advice, Encouragement & Inspiration, Miscellany, Publishing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 21, 2014

More from the Second Annual AASE Conference - "Helping Students Become Lifetime Learners"

At the 2014 AASE Conference in Indianapolis, Professor Elizabeth Bloom of the New England School of Law gave a presentation on the use of formative assessment to enable students to become self-regulated learners.  In her presentation, Professor Bloom addressed the use of formative assessment in law school classes to enhance student learning.

Both summative and formative assessment are necessary in legal education.  Summative assessment provides law schools the opportunity to test whether students have learned the required material.  Used while a course is in progress, formative assessment provides faculty the opportunity to adjust instruction and provides students the opportunity to adjust their approach to learning.

Professor Bloom's presentation drew from her work in academic support and her scholarship on teaching and learning. Both her presentation and her scholarship illustrate that both professors and students bear responsibility to make the most of formative assessment to enhance student learning.  Law faculty should provide students with meaningful feedback on their work, and students must learn to use that feedback to enhance their learning.  

In her presentation, Professor Bloom drew from two pieces of her scholarship.  The first article is on "Teaching Law Students to be Self-Regulated Learners."  The second, more recent article is on providing "(Trans)formative feedback" to law students.   Professor Bloom’s articles provide valuable information as the new academic year approaches.

(Myra G. Orlen)

July 21, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 16, 2014

Welcome changes at Western New England University School of Law . . .

Beginning on July 1st, Kandace Kukas will be the Assistant Dean of Bar Admissions Programs at Western New England University School of Law.  Kandace Kukas comes to Western New England University School of Law with a wealth of experience in bar preparation.  Beginning on August 1st, I will take on the role of Director of Academic Success Programs -- in addition to that of Associate Professor of legal Research and Writing.

(Myra G. Orlen)

June 16, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight, Jobs - Descriptions & Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Who are we? A Question for ASPer's

In light of the upcoming AASE conference in Indianapolis, members of the planning committees and e-board have been circling a number of latent questions. As a member of the e-board, I thought I would put some of these questions on the blog (however, I want to stress that I am speaking solely for myself, and NOT the e-board or AASE.) I think it is valuable to think about who we are, where we are going, and what we want, as a profession.

1) Do we want to be more like "regular" (tenure-track) faculty? What are the benefits to "achieving" this status? Are there drawbacks that we have not considered? Do we want the pressure of "publish or perish" when our jobs include so many year-round responsibilities? Do non-tenure track ASPer's feel the pressure to publish?  Have ASPer's found it difficult to be placed in law reviews? Do ASPer's get support (mentoring, guidance, as well as financial support) from their institutions when they choose to write? How can ASPer's receive more support for writing and publishing?

2) Do we want to be more like legal writing or clinical, faculty? How many of us are ASP/legal writing already? How many of us switched from legal writing to ASP (or vice versa)? How are we like legal writing? Are we like legal writing?

3) As an organization, do we want to be more like LWI? Or do we want our focus to be smaller, more intimate?  LWI is a huge organization because most law school have several legal writing instructors, but only one or two ASP professionals. Are there benefits to growing our organization? Are there specific challenges if we grow too fast?

4) In light of the financial problems facing many, if not most, law schools, should we spend more time discussing the realities of job loss, pay cuts, and declining enrollment? Should we spend more time discussing the pressures facing ASP?

5) The "average" incoming law student now has a lower LSAT than the "average" student in prior incoming classes. Should ASP be in conversation about the trends in admission? How can be be more engaged in the conversation about trends in admission? Implicitly, and sometimes explicitly, we are held responsible for student outcomes, so our livelihoods are connected to these trends. How should we address these trends if we are not responsible for admissions?

6) Is bar prep a natural part of academic success? Or is bar prep a unique partner with ASP, a partnership that shares some similarities, but also differences? How many ASPer's have bar prep responsibilities? Is bar prep combined with ASP out of convenience, necessity, or is it an accident of institutional planning?

7) How do we constrain "job creep" at a time of institutional downsizing? How amny ASPer's feel like their job is on the line if they say no to additional repsonsibilities without additional compensation? Is it fair to expect additional compensation when so many law school graduates cannot find jobs in law?

(Again, I want to stress that I am speaking solely for myself, and NOT the e-board or AASE.)

(RCF)

May 10, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Congratulations to Jeremiah Ho

Congratulations to Jeremiah Ho from University of Massachusetts Dartmouth School of Law!  Many of you will remember Jeremiah from his ASP days before he became a full-time law professor on his move to U Mass Dartmouth.  Jeremiah is one of the editors for the AALS Academic Support Section's Learning Curve.  He has been named by Lawyers of Color as one of the 50 under 50 law professors who are making relevant contributions to the legal profession.  The link to the 50 under 50 article is here: 50 under 50 article.

April 24, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Search and Destroy

As we get closer to finals, a lot of poor-performing students are struggling with outline and exam structure.  At South Carolina, the second semester for First Years is made up of Con Law, Civ Pro, and Property, and all three of these classes seem to cause certain students to "over-write."  For example, even more so than in their First Semester outlines, many students want to include all the minutiae of every case, so I have had at least a dozen students show up in my office saying something to the effect of "I have 120 pages on my outline done -- but I have a little more work to do."

A 120-page plus outline isn't going to help anyone, unless they are planning on clubbing someone with it.  One thing I have found really helpful for these students is to go over practice questions geared to the bar exam (BarBri, Kaplan, Finz, etc.).  These tend to be shorter than questions designed for doctrinal exams, and the idea that you can explain something like the rule for intermediate scrutiny or the Commerce Clause in three sentences is really helpful and mind-blowing.  I've seen a real improvement in students' answers, especially since many of these students' exam issues were running out of time, missing issues, or spending time talking about things that were not going to translate into points.

I've also been using the longer essay questions from Emanuel's Questions and Answers for First Year.  I don't know if this exactly counts as a self-serving plug since I wrote them, but I put them together specifically with this issue in mind.  They are nowhere near the most detailed questions in the world, but they are good if you have a student who just needs to get IRAC together.  I have a lot of these types of students -- who are bright, but write 16-page dissertations for a 20-minute question.  Most of our meetings tend to revolve around focus and getting to the point.

I've also been working with these students using "Shortish Questions from the Realm of Stuff You Will Be Asked" -- so, for example, I have a question about an ordinance limiting firefighters to male citizens between the ages of 20-45 and a question about the state putting the kibosh on an individual's contract with an out-of-state company.  This way, I can talk about breaking up the different levels of scrutiny and the four things that they will probably need to think about when the state messes with a private individual (commerce, contracts, privileges and immunities, due process).  The weakest students have all of this in a jumble of premises and exhortations of fairness, which will clearly sink them on exams if they don't get it cleared up.  (Alex Ruskell)

 

 

 

April 16, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight, Advice, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Renew Your AASE Membership

All members of AASE (Association of Academic Support Educators) should have received emails reminding them to renew their AASE membership for 2014. All current members will also receive, by mail, a copy of their membership information from 2013 and an invitation to renew for 2014. Membership runs from Jan-Dec (calendar year) and dues are due by Jan. 30 for 2014. Two types of membership are available; individual and institutional memberships (for schools with 3+ ASP professionals).  

If you have any questions, or would like to join AASE, please email aasemembership@gmail.com

 

December 26, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Meet Dennis Tonsing - An ASP Writer

Dennis Tonsing is a Senior Instructor for Concord School of Law and since 2007 has lived in South America (first Uruguay and now Ecuador).  In addition to his ASP and bar prep work, Dennis edits legal documents translated from Spanish.  Prior to his international move, Dennis worked as Dean of Students and first Director of the Academic Support Program at Roger Williams School of Law and previously as the first Director of the Academic Support Program at Vermont Law School. 

You will want to check out his book and EZINE articles below:

1000 Days to the Bar But the Practice of Law Begins Now! William S. Hein & Co. (Second Edition 2010)

 

Law School Essay Exams - What to Memorize (December 9, 2011):

http://ezinearticles.com/?Law-School-Essay-Exams---What-to-Memorize&id=6739325

 

Law School Essay Exams - Focus on Key Facts (November 9, 2011):

http://ezinearticles.com/?Law-School-Essay-Exams---Focus-on-Key-Facts&id=6659280

 

Law School Essay Exam Answers: Write for Your Audience (August 29, 2011):

http://ezinearticles.com/?Law-School-Essay-Exam-Answers:-Write-for-Your-Audience%21&id=6519457

 

Avoid Conclusory Statements in Law School Essay Exam Answers (August 25, 2011):

http://ezinearticles.com/?Avoid-Conclusory-Statements-in-Law-School-Essay-Exam-Answers&id=6513991

 

Law School Avoiding Expository Writing in Law School Essay Exams:

http://ezinearticles.com/?Law-School---Avoiding-Expository-Writing-in-Law-School-Essay-Exams&id=3321507

 

 

 

November 6, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 1, 2013

Update on AASE membership

If you are interested in membership in AASE (Association of Academic Support Educators) please note that your inquiries should be directed to aasemembership@gmail.com. You should receive an email with an application within a week of your inquiry. AASE is moving the membership process from UNLV to a more permanent model, with one email address. 

And just a reminder that AASE is planning a FABULOUS conference in Indianapolis, to be held May 30-June 1, 2014. 

For more information about AASE, please see http://www.academicsupporteducators.org 

(RCF)

November 1, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight, Meetings, Miscellany, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 21, 2013

Meet Louis Schulze - An ASP Writer

I would like to introduce you to the third ASP writer in our series.  Louis Schulze is Professor of Law and Director of the Academic Excellence Program at New England School of Law.  Louis is the 2013 Chair of the AALS Section on Academic Support.  I have listed below some of his publications.  (Amy Jarmon)

Alternative Justifications for Academic Support III: An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Academic Support on Perceived Autonomy Support and Humanizing Law Schools 38 Ohio N.U. L. Rev. 999 (2012) (with Dr. Adam A. Ding).
Social Science Research Network

Partnering for the Benefit of All Students:  Simple Ways to Incorporate ASP Techniques Across the Curriculum19(1) The Law Teacher 8  (Fall 2012) (with Rebecca Flanagan).

Alternative Justifications for Academic Support II:  How “Academic Support Across the Curriculum” Helps Meet the Goals of the Carnegie Report and Best Practices40 Cap. U. L. Rev. 1 (2012)
Social Science Research Network

Alternative Justifications for Law School Academic Support Programs: Self-Determination Theory, Autonomy Support, and Humanizing the Law School5 Charleston L. Rev. 269 (2011)
Social Science Research Network

Balancing Law Student Privacy Interests and Progressive Pedagogy: Dispelling the Myth that FERPA Prohibits Cutting-Edge Academic Support Methodologies19 Widener L.J.  215  (2009)
Social Science Research Network

Integrating Doctrinal Material and Faculty into Academic Support2009 The Learning Curve 13      (2009) (with Elizabeth Bloom.)

 

October 21, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Meet Robin Boyle Laisure - An ASP Writer

This is the second in the series on ASP writers.  Robin Boyle Laisure is Assistant Dean for Academic Success and Professor of Law at St. Johns School of Law.  She has written a number of articles and book chapters that deal with academic support topics.  Robin is a prior Chair of the AALS Academic Support Section.  I have listed below some of her publications.  (Amy Jarmon)

Should Laptops Be Banned?  Providing a Robust Classroom Learning Experience Within
Limits, 20(1) PERSPECTIVES: TEACHING LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING 8 (Fall
2011).
 

Law Students Are Different from the General Population: Empirical Findings Regarding
Learning Styles,
with Jeffrey Minneti and Andrea Honigsfeld, 17 (3)
PERSPECTIVES: TEACHING LEGAL RES. & WRITING  153 (2009).
 

Generation X in Law School: How These Law Students are Different from Those Who Teach Them,
with  Joanne Ingham, 56 J.  Legal  Educ. 281 (2006) (peer reviewed).
 

Law Students with Attention Deficit Disorder: How To Reach Them, How to Teach Them,
39(2) J. MARSHALL L. REV. 349 (2006).

Applying Learning Styles Theory in the Workplace:  How to Maximize Learning-Styles
Strengths to Improve Work Performance in Law Practice
, 79 St.
John's Law Review 97 (2005).

Employing Active-Learning Techniques and Metacognition in Law School: Shifting Energy from
Professor to Student, 81 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. 1 (2003).
 

Teaching Law Students Through Individual Learning Styles, with Rita Dunn, 62 Alba. L.
Rev. 213 (1998).
 

How Schools, Parents, and Courts can Respond to Federal Law and Improve Classroom Teaching for At-Risk Students, in DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION FOR  AT-RISK STUDENTS, by Rita
Dunn and Andrea Honigsfeld (2009).

A Blueprint for a Truly Innovative Law School, in What If . . . : A  Guide to Improving Education (R. Dunn & S.A. Griggs, eds., 2007).

Impact of Learning Styles and Law School Teaching, in Synthesis of the Dunn and Dunn Learning-Style Model Research: Who, What, When and What? (St. John's Univ. Center for Study of Learning & Teaching) (R. Dunn & S.A. Griggs, eds., 2007).

Research on Learning Style and Legal Writing, in Synthesis of the Dunn and Dunn Learning-Style Model Research: Who, What, When and What? (St. John's Univ. Center for Study of Learning & Teaching) (R. Dunn & S.A. Griggs, eds., 2007).

Bringing Learning Styles Instructional Strategies to Law School, in Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles Application in Higher Education (R. Dunn & S.A. Griggs, eds., 2000).

The Blind Leading the Blind: What if They're Not all Visual or Tactile Learners, with James B. Levy, 22(2) The Second Draft 6 (2008).

In Response to the Remarks by Lawrence H. Summers, Presenting Empirical Data on the Differences in Learning Styles Between Males and Females, with Andrea Honigsfeld, 11(3) Cardozo Women's L. J. 505 (2005).

October 16, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 14, 2013

Meet Herb Ramy - An ASP Writer

I recently wrote a post about getting involved in writing as ASP'ers.  It occurred to me that our readers might want to meet some of the ASP folks who have contibuted to the wealth of ASP-related articles and books.  Over a series of posts, I'll spotlight some of our ASP writers.  (Amy Jarmon) 

Herb Ramy is Director and Professor of Academic Support at Suffolk University School of Law.  Herb is well-known in ASP for his contributions to the field.  He is a prior Chair of the Academic Support Section for AALS.  Here are just a few of his publications which would interest our readers:

Succeeding in Law School Carolina Academic Press (Second Edition 2010).

Moving Students from Hearing and Forgetting to Doing and Understanding: A Manual for Assessment in Law School, 41 CAP. U. L. REV (forthcoming 2013)

Student Depression Becomes an Issue of Faculty Concern 33:8 STUDENT LAWYER MAGAZINE (2005).

 

 

October 14, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Meet Bonnie Stepleton - A Contributing Editor

Stepleton

Also joining us as a new Contributing Editor is Bonnie Stepleton from the University of New Mexico School of Law.

Bonnie graduated from the University of New Mexico School of Law in 1987.  She served as a law clerk in the New Mexico Supreme Court followed by private practice in the areas of mental health and disabilities law, personal injury and workers’ compensation.  She has been at the University of New Mexico School of Law since 2004, and is Assistant Dean for Student Services. She teaches Bar Strategies Seminar, Interviewing Counseling and Negotiation and coaches in the Mediation class.  She is a member of the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE).

We look forward to having Bonnie as one of the editors and reading her viewpoints from student services as well as academic success.

September 7, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 6, 2013

Meet Myra Orlen - A Contributing Editor

Fdbs_Orlen_M

We would like you to meet our second new Contributing Editor, Myra Orlen from Western New England University School of Law.  The following information is from the WNEU web pages:

After graduation from law school, Professor Orlen served as the Law Clerk for the Honorable Alexander O. Bryner, Chief Judge of the Alaska Court of Appeals, and later served a clerkship in the Superior Court of Massachusetts. After her clerkships, she worked as a Staff Attorney for the University of Massachusetts Student Legal Services Office in Amherst and as an Associate in a Northampton, MA, law firm. Professor Orlen has taught in the law program since 1995.

It is exciting to have Myra join us, and we look forward to her contributions to the blog.  Her legal writing and academic success experience will benefit all of us.

September 6, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)