Friday, April 5, 2013

Moves and Changes

This summer, I will be moving from UConn and UConn Law School to UMass-Dartmouth School of Law, where I will become tenure-track faculty. The move also means I will be shifting back to ASP full-time. As much as I love UConn (and more on that below), I could not turn down the opportunity to work with Dean Mary Lu Bilek, who was a pioneer in ASP at CUNY before becoming dean at UMass. I found the faculty at UMass to be incredibly supportive and genuinely excited to be at the law school, and I was encouraged by the mission of the law school, to provide an affordable option for students seeking to work in public service.

It was an incredibly difficult decision to leave UConn. Not only do I love my job and my students, but I am alum of the school (both my BA and MA are from UConn). I have had amazing opportunities here that I would not have had anywhere else. My experience working with undergraduates has been invaluable. My experience has changed how I view ASP and the types of supports needed by students. I now see the essentiality of ASP-undergrad partnerships, and the growing need for ASP to move outside of the legal academy. To truly understand the challenges facing our incoming students, we need a better understanding of where they are coming from. It's no longer adequate to recall personal memories of our pre-law days, and superimpose our challenges on our students.These students are "digital natives" who are not afraid of the rapid pace of technological change--it's all they have ever known. These are students scarred by the Great Recession, which has shaped their worldview. Their undergraduate experience has shown them that education is not the ticket to security and stability. Incoming students are savvy and informed in ways that were unthinkable just four or five years ago; "buy-in" to the law school pedagogy will require us to prove ourselves and our value to students. ASP should not be afraid to embrace this new generation of law students and their challenge to our curriculum. These students will force us to up our game, to become better, more effective teachers and scholars. Personally, that is a challenge I embrace and encourage. While we work with students to become the best version of themselves, they will force us to better versions of ourselves.

It is bittersweet for me to be moving on from UConn. I love my job, I love my students, and the colleagues I have here will become lifelong friends.  But in this time of uncertainty and change in the legal academy, I am very excited to become to a part of a law school that is embracing the "new normal" and challenges ahead of us. (Rebecca Flanagan) 

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EDIT: 3:44 pm

This is a fantastic post by William Henderson from over at Legal Whiteboard. It dovetails on my message about students and growth.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwhiteboard/2013/04/question-authority-law-students-have-an-important-role-to-play-in-the-future-of-legal-education.html

 

 

April 5, 2013 in About This Blog, Academic Support Spotlight, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Quick note on typos in the blog

I have been meaning to write this for a while, but it came to my attention today.  Amy and I write blog posts between students meetings, teaching, administrative tasks, and myriad other responsibilities. We do our best to catch typos and grammar mistakes before posts hit the site. However, there is not always time to catch every mistake. The blog is not like law review; we don't have months (or even days) to write, proof, and double-check everything that is written and posted. At times, getting a post published is more like a race-to-the-finish law school exam.  We do our best given time constraints. The alternative is to post less frequently.  Please keep in mind that what we type is not always what shows up on the blog; at times technical glitches cause typos we can't erase or fix.

I do fix typos when I see them. Please be gentle on us. If you find an error so egregious you feel it changes the meaning of the text, email the person who wrote the post so it can be corrected. Most typos are the product of typing too fast and trying to get ideas down before the next student appointment interrupts the thought process. (RCF)

April 13, 2010 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Middle-career ASPer's

While my introduction covers all of the perfunctory academic notes, it does not reveal why I would tackle writing for the ASP Law Blog. When Dan Weddle asked me in join in September, I jumped at the chance to give back to the ASP community that has given me so much in the past three years.
However, I was working at both ASU Law and VLS at the time, and I could only commit after January 2008, when I would (just) be at VLS full-time.

I like to think of myself as a relative newbie to Academic Support, but that really isn’t true anymore.  As the list of new positions demonstrates, ASP is growing by leaps and bounds.  I am delighted to meet new faces at every LSAC, AALS, or NCBEX conference.  With almost three years under my belt, I am no longer the new kid on the block, but I am certainly not one of the greats that “was there in 1992” when ASP was officially sanctioned.  When I talk to the *new* newbies, I relize how much I have grown as an Academic Success professional over the past three years.  But when I sit down with any one of the *greats* of ASP, I am awed by how much I still have to learn.  Even more amazing to me is how much the *greats* feel they still have to learn, some with ten or twenty years in ASP.

It’s this spirit of learning and collaboration that makes ASP the best area to work in the legal academy, in my humble opinion. 
I jumped at the chance to join the blog so I can give back some of the modest wisdom I have gained in the past three years. Everyday I still feel like I am in the middle of a vast learning curve, especially after grades come out.  Then I remember what it was like during the fall of 2005, when I was giving advice on IRAC to 1L’s with the ink barely dry on my J.D. 

This is my welcome to all the new folks joining our ranks; I was there not too long ago, and I am happy to help whenever you need it. Just don’t balk if I call myself a newbie as well; I am on the learning curve with you!
This is also my immense, heart-felt thank you to everyone who has given me much-needed advice, wisdom, and pep talks when I felt like I was in over my head.

Rebecca Flanagan

January 30, 2008 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 10, 2007

The ASP Blog is Going on Vacation

The editorial staff members for the ASP Blog are taking next week off (August 13 - 17).  Like many of you, we are trying to catch our collective breath before the new semester is in full swing.  We hope that all of you will have some rest and relaxation time as well.  See you at the beginning of the next semester!   

August 10, 2007 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 9, 2007

New Contributing Editor

David Nadvorney, the ASP blog's new contributing editor, is the Director of the Irene Diamond Professional Skills Center at City University of New York School of Law and has been involved in providing academic support in law schools for many years. He's excited about editing the blog, which he hopes will be an outlet for expression, reaction, feedback, and support for his new experience this semester of teaching an academic support section of first-years torts.  We are thrilled to have David on board. (dbw)

February 9, 2007 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Another Addition to the Editorial Team

Schwartzmichaelthumb_1 I am beginning to feel as though we're getting away with something as I look at the new folks who are joining our editorial team.  Today I have the pleasure of welcoming Michael Schwartz onto the blog as a contributing editor.

Mike has been teaching law for fifteen years.  Six years ago, after nine years as a doctrinal professor, he "begged his way into a hybrid doctrinal/academic support slot."  Mike, who is in his first year at Washburn University School of Law, oversees and teaches Washburn’s First Week Program, an eighteen-hour, self-regulated learning curriculum integrated into his and a colleague’s torts classes; oversees a structured study group program for all entering Washburn students; and oversees the law school’s bar pass program, which he has integrated into his remedies class.

He is the author of Expert Learning for Law Students and a co-author (with Denise Riebe) of Pass the Bar!, both published by Carolina Academic Press.  His Remedies/Bar Pass hybrid text (co-athored with Carole Buckner) is forthcoming from Carolina Academic Press in Spring 2008. 

His teaching and learning scholarship includes two recent law review articles on teaching and learning: "Teaching Law By Design: How Learning Theory and Instructional Design Can Inform and Reform Law Teaching," 38 SAN DIEGO L. REV. 347 (2001), and "Teaching Law Students to be Self-Regulated Learners," MICH. ST. L. REV. 447 (2003), as well as shorter teaching and learning pieces addressing best practices in law school course web page design and the process of creating instructional objectives.  Mike is also a contributing author to Best Practices of Law Schools for Preparing Students to Practice Law (a CLEA publication forthcoming December 2006) and is on the Steering Committee for that project.  He also serves on the Board of Directors of Humanizing Legal Education.

Mike has presented his work on teaching and learning to the law faculties at Hastings, Mercer, Santa Clara, UDC, Albany, the John Marshall Law School (Chicago), John Marshall Law School (Atlanta), North Carolina Central, and Southern New England.  This year, he is scheduled to present to the State Bar of New York and to the law faculties at UMKC Wisconsin. (dbw)

September 12, 2006 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 7, 2006

The Newest Member of Our Editorial Team

Jarmon1 We're welcoming another familiar face to the blog today.  Amy Jarmon is joining us as a contributing editor.  She has a long history of helping students succeed, and we are looking forward to hearing from her regularly on the blog.

Amy was hired to develop the first academic success program for Texas Tech School of Law in 2004.  Although her program serves all 650 law students, she works also with students on probation and teaches in the month-long Introduction to Legal Studies course for entering 1L students whose predictors are lower than those of their classmates. Prior to her move to Texas, Amy was the Director of Academic Success Programs and Acting Assistant Dean for Law Student Services at University of Akron School of Law. 

In her first career, Amy worked in decanal positions with undergraduate students for 17 years and spent 10 of those years working in a “bridge position” between Student Affairs and Academic Affairs to assist students in achieving their potential inside and outside the classroom.  Amy is a licensed attorney in Virginia and on the Roll of Solicitors for England and Wales.  She teaches Comparative Law: The English Legal System as an elective course for upper-division students. (dbw)

September 7, 2006 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

My New Co-editor

Estillman_1 As we begin looking toward the new semester, I want to take a moment to welcome Liz Stillman as my new co-editor.  Liz took on the role of contributing editor this last school year as I was coming on as co-editor with Dennis Tonsing.  Liz's posts have been a delight to read, and she is an exceptionally charming person with whom to work, so I am thrilled to have her join me in handling the primary responsibilities for the ASP blog.

Dtonsing I also want to thank Dennis Tonsing for his exemplary service as co-editor of the blog and for asking me to join him a year ago.  Dennis is taking a well-deserved rest from the duties of co-editor, but he'll still be around as a contributing editor; so we'll all continue to enjoy his musings, advice, and insights. 

So thanks, Dennis, and welcome, Liz. I'm looking forward to another year working with both of you. (dbw)

June 21, 2006 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 13, 2005

"New Kid on the Blog"

Weddle Please welcome Dan Weddle, Director of Academic Support at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, as co-editor for this blog.  In his first post, Dan refers to himself as “the new kid on the block,” but he has been a frequent visitor to our block for some time, just not as an ASP director. 

I first met Dan when he recruited me to teach in the Council on Legal Education Opportunity’s (CLEO) Attitude Is Essential Weekends, which Dan designed and directed as a crash course law school preparation program targeting students from disadvantaged backgrounds.  Dan had been working with CLEO since the late ‘90s, when he brought in the first two CLEO Summer Institutes UMKC had ever hosted.  He has been directing Attitude Is Essential Weekends every summer since 2002, recruiting academic support types from all over the country to teach students who were unable to attend the longer Summer Institutes.

Dan’s prior experience also includes twelve years as a middle school and high school English teacher, including five years as an academic dean responsible for curriculum development and faculty development.  He left teaching to attend law school at the University of Kansas and practiced civil litigation until joining UMKC in 1996.  During the 1999-2000 school year, he was tapped to serve as an interim assistant dean of UMKC’s School of Education.

For a new kid on the block, he knows the neighborhood better than he thinks.  (djt)

October 13, 2005 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 13, 2005

Census of Law Professor Bloggers

This morning's PrawfsBlawg has an interesting census of the current law professor blogging population.  They report that 103 law professors currently blog; we have 24 law professors who blog as part of our Law Professor Blogs Network.

PrawfsBlawg notes that of the 103 law professor bloggers, 80.6% (83) are male and 19.4% (20) are female.  The comparable numbers for the 24 members of the Law Professor Blogs Network:  62.5% (15) male and 37.5% (9) female.

Here are the law schools with the most law professor bloggers:

Law Schools with Most Law Prof Bloggers

School

Number of Bloggers

San Diego

7

Cincinnati

4

George Mason

4

Ohio State

4

UCLA

4

George Washington

4

Stanford

4

St. Thomas

4

Chapman

4

June 13, 2005 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 22, 2005

Juris Novus Featuring Blogs from the Law Professor Blogs Network

Juris Novus, law blog aggregator, is proud to announce a collaboration with Law Professor Blogs. Juris Novus will be featuring a rotating cast of blogs from the Law Professor Blog network.

Keeping up with the blogsphere is a daunting task as new blogs come online daily. Juris Novus provides order and centralization, pulling together relevant headlines and presenting them on a single page.

Law professors greatly influence the legal blogsphere. Academia demands a clear writing voice and current knowledge of legal ongoings. Successful blogging demands the same, it comes as no surprise that professors have risen to the top of the law blogsphere. In honor of those law professors who have contributed to the rich culture of the legal blogsphere, Juris Novus features a heavier balance of law professor blogs.

Juris Novus is updated three times an hour and stores headlines on a history page when you miss a day. Save time and simplify your day with Juris Novus. Thank you for making the legal blogsphere a better place!

The Law Professor Blogs Network is proud to announce a collaboration with Juris Novus, one of the finest law blog aggregators online. Juris Novus will be featuring a rotating cast of blogs from our Network.

May 22, 2005 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 11, 2005

LexisNexis Sponsors Law Professor Blogs Network

Lexislogo200We are thrilled to announce that LexisNexis has agreed to sponsor all of the blogs in our Law Professor Blogs Network:

LexisNexis shares our vision for expanding the network into other areas of law, so please email us if you would be interested in finding out more about starting a blog as part of our network.

April 11, 2005 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, February 13, 2005

A Place to Gather

Keeping with the tradition of blogging (well, it may be a bit premature to write of a "tradition"), Richard and I are hoping that members of the Law School Academic Support community around the country will find this site a place to gather.  It's time we have a central repository to post our ideas, strategies, theories and __________ (this is interactive - you fill in the blank).  Check in from time to time and let others know what's on your mind.

Dennis

February 13, 2005 in About This Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)