Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Bar Prep Conversation at SEALS

I attended the Southeastern Association of Law Schools (SEALS) Conference earlier this week.  On Monday, August 6, 2018, the conference schedule included two bar preparation strategy sessions.  Here are my takeaways from those two sessions.

The first session was a panel discussion entitled "Bar Preparation Strategies for Law Professors and Academic Support Program."  

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Professor James McGrath of Texas A&M University School of Law used an IF-AT quiz to frame his discussion about how spaced repetition and self-efficacy are essential components to bar exam success.  Next, Professor Kirsha Trychta of West Virginia University College of Law introduced ways to mobilize students, faculty, and staff to become soldiers in both academic support and bar preparation efforts.  The session concluded with Professor Patrick Gould of Appalachian School of Law demonstrating how to methodically work through a MBE practice problem and how to spot legal issues.  Professor Melissa Essary of Campbell University's Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law expertly moderated the program.

After the panel presentation, attendees engaged in a lively round-table discussion focused on "Strategies for Bar Preparation and Success." 

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Each participant had 10-12 minutes to discuss a bar preparation related issue or topic that was of interest to them.  More than 30 discussants attended the session, including academic support and bar preparation professors, commercial course providers, and deans.  (The session was standing room only!)  Of those in attendance, roughly half of the group raised discussion topics.  While the full agenda—including the presenters’ school affiliation, contact information, and formal presentation title—is available here (Download BAR PASSAGE SPEAKER SCHEDULE Revised 3), I’ve set forth a brief summary below.  If a discussion item sounds interesting to you, I encourage you to reach out to the presenter.  Every presenter warmly invited questions and comments.  

Bob Keuhn is authoring a research paper on the results of a recent large-scale empirical study, where he found little evidence that clinical or experiential coursework helps students pass the bar exam, contrary to popular belief.

James McGrath offered five quick tips for improving classroom teaching, including adding formative assessment activities directly on the course syllabus so that quizzes and reflection exercises become an essential and routine component of the course.  

Michael Barry & Zoe Niesel outlined how they “went big” and dared to “be bold” overhauling and expanding their ASP program.  They proactively asked for input from faculty, the advancement (i.e. fundraising) department, career services, and others before moving forward.

Benjamin Madison focused on self-directed learning, and emphasized the importance of incorporation skills building, especially in the first-year, to help students become better self-directed learners.  He recommended Dean Michael Hunter Schwartz’s book as a jumpstart.  

Ron Rychlak shared his experience with bar passage efforts at two (very) different law schools: Ole’ Miss and Ava Maria.  He tinkered with requiring more bar-tested electives, increasing the probation cut-off GPA, and adding more academic support style-courses in the first two years.

Antonia Miceli redesigned her third-year bar course from an “opt in” (i.e. invitation to enroll) to an “opt out” model.  All students in the bottom third of the class are now automatically enrolled, and the student must proactively petition to opt out of the course—which has positively increased her overall enrollment.

Debra Moss Vollweiler has spent the last few years as a member of a Florida bar passage focus group, and is now advancing the 3-Ms model: master in 1L, manipulate in 2L, and memorize in 3L.  The 3M model aligns with her law school’s newly revised learning outcomes.  

Cassie Christopher debuted her online 3-credit, graded, MBE course, which is open to all graduating students.  Students watch an online video created by in-house doctrinal faculty, read the required textbook, complete practice MBEs, and engage in a discussion board each week.

Kirsha Trychta asked for attendees’ input on ways to mobilize the entire faculty in bar preparation.  Discussants suggested incorporating the MPT into a clinical course, asking faculty to guest lecture, making a practice essay and MBE database on TWEN, inviting outside third-party speakers, and involving the assessment committee in programmatic decision making.  

Rob McFarland highlighted a recent (and controversial) conversation online, directed at law school hopefuls, about whether an LSAT score accurately predicts bar passage success.

Laurie Zimet proposed that law schools should (1) educate the entire law school community about the bar exam and invite each person to contribute where they could, and (2) provide an opportunity for students to diagnosis weaknesses, with sufficient time for remediation.

Melissa Essary designed a new course—in just a few months—which offered academic credit for a graded, in-house faculty taught, one semester, flipped classroom MBE bar preparation course, supplemented by Barbri videos and materials.   

Patrick Gould, the session’s moderator, concluded by thanking Russel Weaver for hosting us, and encouraging everyone to brainstorm about what we can do next year to make the event even better.  

Well done, team!
(Kirsha Trychta)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2018/08/bar-prep-conversation-at-seals.html

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