Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Test Driving Khan Academy's LSAT course

Last week I posted about The Future of the LSAT, including LSAC’s collaboration with Khan Academy to provide free online LSAT prep to everyone.  This week I am taking Khan Academy’s LSAT course for a test drive.

Registering for the course was simple.  I just needed to input my name, date of birth, and email address.  Then I selected LSAT prep from the list of available courses.  Once I was officially enrolled, Khan Academy provided me with an overview of their 4 step system:

“1. ... Take a mini-test or a full practice test, and [Khan Academy] will identify the skills you should focus on to improve your score the most.

2. ... Unlock your personalized practice plan. Based on your score goal, schedule, and starting skill strengths, [Khan Academy] will craft a unique practice plan with lessons and exercises at just the right level.

3. ... Step-by-step lessons and explanations will help you understand the questions and concepts on the LSAT, and official LSAT practice tests develop the test-taking and time-management skills you’ll need to reach your goal.

4. ... Your practice plan is divided into stages that start with focused skill practice and end with a LSAT practice test. As your weaknesses turn into strengths, you’ll see your test scores rise towards your goal.”

Because I was strangely curious about how I’d score with 15 years of legal analysis under my wing, I opted to take the 3 hour full-length exam instead of the 70 minute mini-diagnostic.  The diagnostic exam—comprised of four graded sections—did not have an official timer (you had to time yourself), but did let you skip between questions within each section and highlight passages in the reading comprehension section.  I get the impression that the system may allow for timed tests,  however, because under the personal settings tab I was given the option to adjust the testing timer for time-and-a-half or double-time. 

I found completing the diagnostic exam online slightly more difficult than a pencil and paper version because I could not engage in active reading techniques or quickly cross-out obviously wrong answer choices.  Unsurprisingly, I’ve heard the same complaint from law students who are studying for the multiple-choice section of the bar exam using primarily online resources.  My experience this week, combined with my students’ feedback, reinforced a growing concern that I have about LSAC’s decision to explore a digital LSAT exam. 

All that aside, at the conclusion of the diagnostic exam, I received my overall score, as well as my score on each particular section.  I was then given the option to create a personalized study schedule based on (1) my upcoming LSAT exam date and (2) my target score.

I selected a test date three months away (September) and a target score 9 points higher than my diagnostic score.  With that information, the program suggested that I complete 10 full-length practice exams and study approximately 2 hours per week to reach my goal.  I could also opt-in to receive automatic email reminders to help me stay on track.  My personal study plan included “sub-goals” and very specific target areas on which to focus my efforts (e.g. reading comprehension passages dealing with science), based on my diagnostic performance.  This project chunking and mini-goal setting system is definitely a fantastic skill to teach aspiring law students and a welcome feature in the program.  

Regardless of whether I opted to complete the diagnostic exam, I could click on the “lessons” tab at the top of the page to instantly access the full repository of available handouts, videos, and practice problems.  Click here to Download List of Khan Academy's LSAT Lessons.  The 1 to 10 minute lecture videos stream via an embedded You Tube player and include closed captioning, if desired.  The quick guides and handouts had helpful tips, but were entirely online.  I also received “energy points” for each goal achieved and activity completed, in the same vein as a video game.

Overall, the Khan Academy LSAT program appears to be quite robust—especially given its zero dollar price tag.  I would recommend this website to law school hopefuls.  (Kirsha Trychta)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2018/06/test-driving-khan-academys-lsat-course.html

Exams - Studying, Study Tips - General, Web/Tech | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment