Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

The Future of the LSAT

The LSAT is changing.   

The Law School Admission Council announced four big changes to the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) in 2017.  

First, LSAC is increasing the number of test administrations.  Beginning in 2019, LSAC will offer six tests each year instead of the standard four.  Presumably to soften the transition from four tests in 2017 to six tests in 2019, LSAC quietly added a 5th exam to the calendar for 2018.  Registration is currently open for the newly added fifth test, which will take place on July 23, 2018.  

Second, LSAC has begun to conduct Digital LSAT field tests.  LSAC is exploring the possibility of transitioning to a computer-based exam, instead of the traditional paper-and-pencil version.  The results of the first field test, which was conducted in October 2017, have not been made available to the public yet. 

Third, LSAC eliminated the maximum-of-three-tests-in-two-years restriction.  Applicants may now take the LSAT exam as many times as they would like, limited only by the frequency of test administrations and cost.    

Lastly, LSAC partnered with Khan Academy to offer "free personalized LSAT prep for all."  The Khan Academy LSAT program launches this week (June 1, to be exact).  I plan to enroll and test-drive the program.  Look for a follow-up report soon. 

Meanwhile, in April 2018, the American Bar Association's Standards Review Committee of the Section on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar recommended eliminating the LSAT requirement altogether, allowing law schools to focus on other admissions credentials.  The committee's proposal was then considered by the section's council at their May 11th meeting, and after some small changes, the council adopted the committee's recommendation.  The changes to Standards 501 and 503 would eliminate the requirement of a “valid and reliable test” as part of a law school’s admissions process.  "Significantly, the Council also adopted a new interpretation ... that would establish a “rebuttable presumption” that recognizes the centrality of a valid and reliable admissions test in law schools’ admissions policies and practices. It provides that a school whose admissions policy and process were called into question by the Council would presumptively be out of compliance with the revised Standard 501 if it did not include a valid and reliable admissions test as part of its policy.”  The Council's recommendation will now be forwarded to the ABA's House of Delegates , who could consider the issue as early as this August. 

LSAC's President responded to the May 11th ABA vote with a short press release, stating that LSAC "anticipates that most law schools will continue to use the LSAT in the admission process because of its proven validity and reliability for predicting success in law school."

(Kirsha Trychta)

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2018/05/free-lsat-prep-launched-june-1-1.html

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