Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Thursday, October 2, 2014

You passed! You didn't pass. Strike that, reverse it.

Picture this:  Your new suit is pressed and ready, your parents have arrived from out of town, and your celebratory dinner reservation has been made.  Then, you get a call; one you could have never imagined receiving.  You thought you passed the bar exam (because you were on the pass list); but, the State Bar Commission tells you during that fateful phone call that there was an error.  (Insert menacing music here.)  Unfortunately, they deliver the news that there was a clerical error and that you actually did not pass the bar exam.  What???  How could this happen?

This is exactly what happened in Nebraska this week when three almost attorneys were called 24 hours before being sworn in and told that they fell just a few points short of passing the bar exam even though they were initially told that they had passed.  One phone call changed their life.  While I often remind students that this is just an exam, it is an exam that consumes extensive amounts of time, money, and willpower.  It is not an exam that anyone (other than a select few) wants to take over and over. 

Mistakes happen.  However, with high stakes testing such as the bar exam, shouldn't there be more stringent standards in place so that mistakes of this magnitude do not occur?  If our society relies on the bar exam to determine a lawyer's competency to practice law, are we not also allowed to require those who administer the bar exam to be competent?  With news such as this from Nebraska, we may need to start asking, who polices the gatekeepers?

 

Lisa Bove Young

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2014/10/you-passedyou-didntstrike-thatreverse-it.html

Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams, Current Affairs | Permalink

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