Monday, August 4, 2014

more in common than you think . . ..

Recent graduates, who have just taken the bar exam; students about to return to law school; and students about to enter law school have more in common than you think.  Sure they are all heading toward legal careers.  But in addition to the obvious, all of them may find themselves with time on their hands.  All can benefit by reading good books. Recent bar takers can get to books that they had little or no time for in the recent past.  Returning and new students can read for pleasure in the time remaining before the start of the fall semester.  To quote one of my legal writing colleagues, "a good way to improve one's writing is to read good writing."  

Taking my own advice and, once again, relying on my blogging son, I've turned to a book that he suggested: The Checklist Manifesto, by Atul Gawande.  Gawande, a surgeon, begins with the premise that failures can stem from either lack of knowledge or ineptitude.  Gawande then addresses the use of checklists – in multiple disciplines – to manage extraordinary amounts of knowledge and expertise.   

Checklists help to ensure that any task is done completely.  For example, law students preparing to submit a writing assignment can use checklists as they edit the assignment.  Additionally, as law students prepare for exams, they can use their course outlines, to prepare checklist for addressing the legal issues that may be tested in each course.  

Similarly, both newly admitted and experienced attorneys can develop and use checklists in a variety of contexts.  For example, transactional attorney can use checklists – tailored to any transaction – to ensure that they fully perform all necessary tasks. 

(Myra Orlen)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2014/08/more-in-common-than-you-think-.html

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