Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Toxic People

Several law students have recently bemoaned the pettiness and spitefulness of other law students.  It is not uncommon in the midst of the competition and the quest for superiority that some law students denigrate others' intelligence or abilities or accomplishments.  They think the put-downs show their own competence and lessen the other person's worth.  They want to sabotage their competition with mean remarks.

In truth, the inferior ones are the law students who feel compelled to make such remarks, to taunt other law students, and to tout their own superiority.  They are simply not nice people.  And if it were not for the self-contained environment of the law school, everyone could easily avoid them.

Too often law students react to these toxic people in ways that encourage them rather than short-circuit their venom.  Onlookers will snicker to feel accepted by these toxic students or to cover up their own insecurities.  The fawning snickerers should beware; toxic law students don't have loyalty to anyone except themselves.  One slip and the fawner today can be the target next week.

Other law students stand by silently and say nothing even though they know the behavior is unacceptable.  They don't want to get involved.  They don't want to tell the toxic law student to apologize or to leave the other person alone.  They could counter the snide remark with a positive one to the student who has just been put down.  Or they could even befriend the student who is the target.  

How sad that the people who are some day going to be officers of the court and supposedly uphold justice and protect the vulnerable are so unwilling to act professionally during law school.  The toxic ones will probably turn into the arrogant partners who bully new associates and paralegals.  The fawners will continue to be spineless ingratiators in practice.  The silent onlookers will continue to not take a stand once they are admitted to the bar.

Fortunately, there are some law students who know the difference between right and wrong and will come to the defense of others.  Instead of fuming later, they will intervene at the time.  They will be polite, even diplomatic, but stand up for what is appropriate behavior among professionals. 

Some law students will likely comment that nothing can be done and that it is just the way law school is.  However, each law student's individual actions can impact the atmosphere of a law school.  If each person who does not like the toxic behavior that develops in law schools were to oppose that behavior, law schools would be less stressful places for everyone.  (Amy Jarmon)    

  

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