Thursday, November 1, 2012

Want Halloween to Continue a Little Longer?

If Halloween is one of your favorite times of year, you will want to look at a new publication entitled Halloween Law by my colleague at Texas Tech School of Law, Victoria "Vickie" Sutton.  The book discusses cases dealing with a number of 1L courses as well as advanced courses: oil and gas, intellectual property, military law, legal ethics, and others.  These cases show our students that you can have fun learning the law.  The chapters include final exams with answer explanations for those who would not want students to have too much fun while studying law!  The book is a quick, fun read with some very interesting case facts.  Enjoy the read - sorry the candy ran out last night.  (Amy Jarmon)   

November 1, 2012 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Why I Work in ASP - Part I

LeeCourtney

Courtney Lee, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director of Academic Success, at McGeorge has responded to our request that ASP'ers share why they work in ASP. 

Courtney has worked for 4.5 years in academic success and writes:

"Working in ASP allows me to help people much more directly than I could if I worked in a firm.  Then I get to watch them go forth and help others!  Some come from unimaginable hardship, and there is nothing better than watching them rise, shine, and pay it forward." 

Thank you for your insight into ASP work, Courtney.  We are so fortunate to have you involved in the ASP profession and helping law students at McGeorge.

Join us and share why you work in ASP.  Send the information requested in our earlier 10/31 post to Amy Jarmon, Co-Editor (e-mail link in the left-hand column of the blog page). 

 

November 1, 2012 in Academic Support Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Why do you work in ASP? Have your say!

I would like to do a series of posts featuring my amazing ASP colleagues.  ASP'ers are so dedicated to improving not only student academics but also student lives!  Whether you have worked in ASP for just 2 months or over 20 years, your thoughts will encourage and inspire others. 

Please send me 50 words or less on why you work in academic success work (this description includes bar preparation and pre-law work that you might do in addition to other academic success tasks).

With your submission include:

  1. either a link to your faculty profile on your law school website and/or a small jpeg picture
  2. your job title
  3. how long you have been in ASP work.

I look forward to receiving your thoughts.  (Amy Jarmon)

October 30, 2012 in Encouragement & Inspiration | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 28, 2012

ZZZZZZZZZZ

Sleep is essential.  Most law students short themselves on enough sleep.  Rather than allowing them to get more done, less sleep actually decreases their learning.

Here are sleep facts:

  1. If a person gets less than 7 hours of sleep consistently, the medical diagnosis is chronic sleep deprivation.
  2. The average person needs 7-8 hours of sleep per night to function optimally.
  3. Some people need more than 8 hours of sleep for medical reasons or other circumstances.
  4. The body and brain work best with a consistent sleep routine - going to bed (Sunday through Thursday nights) and getting up (Monday through Friday mornings) at the same time.
  5. On the weekends, you can vary the sleep schedule 2-2 1/2 hours without whacking out your body clock for the rest of the week (go to bed at 1 a.m. instead of 11 p.m. and get up at 9:30 a.m. instead of 7:00 a.m., for example).
  6. Having a consistent sleep schedule will cause you to get sleepy as bedtime approaches and to wake up a few minutes before the alarm goes off.
  7. The average person needs 3 hours to complete a full sleep cycle.
  8. If you wake up with less than 90 minutes before your alarm will go off, you are probably better to get up than go back to sleep because your sleep cycle was interrupted at an inopportune point and result in grogginess if you go back to sleep.
  9. Sleep inducers before bed: warm milk, a lavendar bubble bath, at least 1/2 hour of wind down time.
  10. Sleep inducers once in bed: a dark room, a quiet room, lack of electronic gadgets in the bedroom (television, computer, etc.).
  11. Sleep inhibitors: alcohol, caffeine, a large meal near bedtime, exercise too close to bedtime, electronic stimulation right before bed (television, computer, etc.).
  12. Realize that if you wake up during the night that it is not unusual to take 15 minutes to fall back to sleep - do not stare at the digital alarm clock waiting to go back to sleep.
  13. If you wake up during the night with worries that you will forget something, keep a pad and pen on the nightstand and capture your thoughts - it will be easier to go back to sleep.
  14. If you toss and turn for a long period and cannot get back to sleep, get up and go to another room and read something boring before you try to go back to bed.
  15. A consistent sleep routine will eliminate the need for excessive napping.
  16. Power napping of 5-30 minutes can refresh some people.
  17. Naps of more than 20-30 minutes actually make you more groggy.
  18. Sufficient sleep has the following benefits:
  • Increased focus when studying.
  • Increased retention of material.
  • Greater productivity within the time spent studying.
  • Decreased irritability and stress.
  • Weight loss.

Getting the proper number of ZZZZ's is very important.  Do not skimp here if you want to be alert, focused, and learning-ready.  (Amy Jarmon) 

October 28, 2012 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)