Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Diagnose, Deliver, and Destroy

I know this title sounds like a new Hollywood apocalyptic action film; but, it is not.  Instead, this is the next step that I suggest repeat bar examinees take in their journey to passing the bar exam.  Once these grads have processed their emotions regarding their bar results, they are ready to look toward the future.

Diagnosing weaknesses from their past exam is helpful so that they know how to effectively structure their study schedule for the upcoming exam.  I read through their essays and look for accurate and complete issue identification, errors or law, and their use of key facts in their analysis. (The WA bar exam is currently essay-only.)  I also pay close attention to their organizational framework and approach to each essay.  I find that students with weak organization likely did not write enough practice essays. Or, they wrote practice essays during bar review; but, they either did not write the essays under testing conditions (closed-book and timed) or they did not evaluate their essays after writing them.  I ask them to assess how they studied for the bar the first time and to think about ways they could improve their routine. 

Delivering tough love is also a necessary part of this process.  Sometimes delivering tough love along with pointing out their imperfections is too much for them to take in one sitting.  One must tread lightly and gauge emotional stability when dealing with repeat bar exam takers.  While you may hear Aaron Neville crooning the song “Tell it Like It Is” in the back of your mind, these repeat exam takers may not be prepared mentally to hear what you have to say.  If you recognize that they have not already reached a level of acceptance with their results, they may not be ready to move forward with the rest of the meeting.

However, it is counterproductive to merely tell these grads what they want to hear.  They are in my office for my honest opinion about what they did wrong and how they can remedy those defects. Thus, I offer constructive criticism and try to deliver it with a spoonful of sugar (…it helps the medicine go down).  As mentioned in my earlier post, I always have a basket full of chocolate nearby and that seems to help. 

Likely, there are high points in their exam file.  I focus first on a good example or concentrate on a higher scored essay.  Then, I move to an essay that may need more work.  By evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, they have a better understanding of which features to maintain and which to change. In recognizing their strengths; they build confidence.  In understanding their weaknesses, they build up their determination and resilience, which they will need in order to move forward.

Together, once we have diagnosed the flaws in their past exam and identified their strengths, I instruct them to put that exam away and stop thinking about it.  They can no longer change what happened during that 2 day exam.  It was a snapshot in their life, which will be filled with a million more.  In order to move forward, one must let go of the past.  It is time for them to destroy their self-doubt.  It is time for them to destroy the negativity around their past experience.  They cannot make a new plan without first destroying any uncertainty that they have in their ability to pass.

Lisa Young

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2012/12/diagnose-deliver-and-destroy.html

Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams, Encouragement & Inspiration | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef017ee5e8f81e970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Diagnose, Deliver, and Destroy:

Comments

Post a comment