Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The 3L Blahs

Have you noticed your 3L students struggling a bit?  They stop to chat and tell me that they are lacking motivation, have the blahs, cannot focus, or other descriptions of their malaise when it comes to law school.

For some, it is that they are focusing on their job hunt and have taken their focus off courses.  For some, it is a focus on December graduation and chomping at the bit to be done.  For some it is a focus on taking the bar in February before their final spring semester is over and thinking about bar review now.  For many it is just being sick and tired of law school with this semester and another one left to go.

For many of our 3L students, the third year seems like more of the same.  The study tasks are just like the first two years.  Unless they have elective courses that really grab their attention and introduce them to or re-immerse them in an area of law that they have a passion for, the courses seem uninspiring. 

Some exceptions to the 3L boredom problem are our externship and clinic students.  They seem to be energized by the change of pace they have during the semester.  Other exceptions are those students who are in Trial Advocacy or other practice-oriented classroom experiences.  Students who have traditional classes with even some component that breaks the mold (one drafting assignment, one client interaction, etc.) also seem more engaged in those classes.

What can 3L students with the blahs do to increase their motivation and focus if they do not have any of these types of classroom experiences?  Here are some thoughts:

  • Employ more active study techniques.  Ask questions while reading.  Read aloud instead of silently.  Discuss cases and concepts with others.  Switch up the facts and consider how the court would have responded to that new fact situation.  Answer all of the questions at the ends of cases even if not required. 
  • Imagine that the client in the case had walked into one's own office with the legal problem.  What questions would be asked of the client?  What additional arguments could have been made by each side that were not made?  What would be the strengths and weaknesses of those arguments?  Are there any policy considerations?  What ethical problems could have surfaced in the situation?    
  • Consider after each class how the information could be used in practice.  Create hypothetical scenarios to delve into how the basics learned in the course would relate to a variety of legal situations.
  • Discuss those hypotheticals with classmates.  If you are uncertain how the concepts would work in the scenario, talk with the professor about the scenario.  
  • Volunteer for pro bono opportunities to see the law in action instead of feeling on the sidelines. 
  • Find part-time legal work in the community - even if it is an unpaid internship - to increase one's interaction with lawyers and involvement in the practice of law.
  • Remind oneself of one's original goals for coming to law school and how courses will help one in passing the bar and practicing after graduation.

Even when 3L students feel that they just want to be done with their degrees, they still have the ultimate goal of becoming the best possible attorneys.  Each bit of knowledge, each fact-scenario analysis, each probing question can lead to that goal - even when one is tempted to consider all of it just same old-same old. 

Hang in there and take one day at a time.  Learn as much as you can because for most future attorneys this will be the last time that they have the luxury to focus on learning.  (Amy Jarmon)  

  

 

   

 

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