Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Reminder: Associate Director of Bar Services Position at Duquesne

Associate Director of Bar Services

Faculty Posting Date: November 2, 2016

To Apply: apply.interfolio.com/39174

Duquesne University School of Law invites applications for the position of Associate Director of Bar Services, a hybrid academic support and bar preparation position. The successful candidate will be appointed to a 12-month, renewable, 405(c), non-tenure-track, assistant clinical professor position. The Associate Director's primary responsibilities will be to teach a section of the Law School's Bar Preparation course and to help the Director of Bar Support to prepare graduating and recent graduates to sit for the bar. As a member of the Law School Faculty, the Associate Director may be assigned other duties consistent with that role and the overall goals of the Law School and the Bar Preparation and Academic Support Programs, including, but not limited to, helping the Director of Bar Services and the Director of Academic Support to implement programming to enhance the professional development of second- and third-year students as they make curricular choices, sharpen their academic skill, and prepare to take the bar examination and helping upper-level students improve their academic and professional skills.

Catholic in its mission and ecumenical in spirit, Duquesne University values equality of opportunity as an educational institution and as an employer. We aspire to attract and sustain a diverse faculty that reflects contemporary society, serves our academic goals and enriches our campus community. We particularly encourage applications from members of underrepresented groups and support dual-career couples through our charter membership in this region's HERC (http://www.hercjobs.org/oh-western-pa-wv/).

Qualifications:

Minimum requirements include a J.D. degree and admission to the practice of law, preferably within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Ideal candidates will have teaching experience in bar preparation or academic services, preferably as a full-time member of a bar preparation or academic support program, or, failing that, in legal research and writing or in some other capacity that required an emphasis on analyzing and applying the law. Substantive knowledge and experience regarding Pennsylvania law and the Pennsylvania bar exam is helpful. The successful candidate must have excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills, strong organizational skills, and the ability to work with a wide range of constituents.

Application Instructions:

Duquesne University uses Interfolio to collect all Division of Academic Affairs faculty and administrative job applications electronically. The application consists of a detailed letter of application, a current CV, and contact information for three professional references. Review of applications will begin immediately and will close no later than March 10, 2017. Apply at http://apply.interfolio.com/39174. To learn more about Duquesne University School of Law, please visit: http://law.duq.edu/.

________________________________________

Duquesne University was founded in 1878 by its sponsoring religious community, the Congregation of the Holy Spirit. Duquesne University is Catholic in mission and ecumenical in spirit. Motivated by its Catholic identity, Duquesne values equality of opportunity both as an educational institution and as an employer.


January 15, 2017 in Jobs - Descriptions & Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Carolinas Colloquium - Call for Proposals

See the attached PDF for more information: Download 2017 Carolinas Colloquium Call for Proposals.

January 14, 2017 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 13, 2017

Call for Proposals Deadline for AASE Extended to January 18th.

The 2017 Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) Conference is set for May 23-25, 2017, at Texas A&M School of Law in Fort Worth, Texas.

The conference presents a wonderful opportunity to expand and enhance your professional experience by sharing your skills and knowledge with an audience of peers from law schools across the country. The Call for Proposals is attached.

**In light of the severe weather across the country, we will be extending the deadline to allow members the opportunity to take advantage of this three-day weekend to finalize any ideas for proposals and submit them by Wednesday, January 18th.**

Proposals must be submitted to aaseconference@gmail.com no later than January 18, 2017. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Thank you,

Megan Kreminski, AASE Programming Committee Co-Chair Download AASE 2017 Call for Proposals (002)

January 13, 2017 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Weapon of Choice

Many great students have trouble with multiple choice, and as people get geared up for the February bar, I have a lot of students come in and tell me something along the lines of "I've never been good at it."  For the majority of them, the problem is that they overthink things before choosing an answer or go back and change right answers to wrong ones.

If you are as student who has never done well on multiple choice, take a run at 25 or so practice questions without ever allowing yourself to change an answer (either in your head or on the paper).  See how it works out.  I've had a lot of students do this and discover that they do much better on multiple choice exams if they force themselves to take the exam this way.  Unless the problem with the question is that you don't know the law or didn't read the question carefully, going with your first instinct is probably the way to go.  As a budding lawyer, your mind can probably see the arguments and talk its way into or out of just about anything.

And, if you are studying for the February Bar and need some cheering up, here is a video of Christopher Walken dancing to "Weapon of Choice" by Fatboy Slim. 

Weapon of Choice -- Fatboy Slim

(Alex Ruskell)

 

January 13, 2017 in Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 12, 2017

The Possible Empirical Value of the Computer-Disconnected Classroom Experience

Hat tip to Dr. Nancy Johnson!

In a recently published article entitled "How Laptop Internet Use Relates to Classroom Learning," researchers Susan Ravizza, Mitchell Uitvlugt, and Kimberly Fenn report two interesting findings with respect to the empirical relationship between classroom internet use and final exam scores.  

First (and perhaps not surprisingly), according to the article classroom non-academic use (such as surfing the web, watching videos, or using social media) has a negative impact on final exam scores.

Second (and perhaps surprisingly), according to the article classroom academic use of a computer (such as to look up a term that is being discussed in class on Wikipedia) has no measurable impact on final exam scores.

Taken together, the research suggests some caution with respect to student use of computers in classroom settings because, based on their findings, even academic use of computers by students during the classroom is not producing beneficial learning outcomes as measured by final exam scores.

In light of the lively debate concerning student use of computers in classrooms and potential benefits or detriments, here's the article in full:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0956797616677314

(Scott Johns)

January 12, 2017 in Advice, Exams - Studying, Learning Styles, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Reality Strikes

This week has been filled with conversations about the bar exam. While I am very excited about these discussions, 3L students are much less enthusiastic. The bar exam has been a distant occurrence but now, it is too close for comfort. For our jurisdiction, students have until March to submit their applications without incurring late fees. Students who are organized and plan every aspect of their lives have already sought answers to their questions and only need to submit their applications. Others are panicking because they believe that they are “behind the ball.”

What is most exciting for me are the conversations about fears, concerns, and how to navigate the bar preparation process. It is a delicate balance between supporting students and challenging them. I typically use this opportunity to dispel myths students share about studying for and taking the bar exam and provide context for why and how to be effective in their own process. It is equally exciting to help students who I am familiar with and whose habits I know. When you know how a student processes information, you can provide them with specific advice and applicable examples of how to manage specific situations. You can also refer them back to specific challenges and situations they overcame, including reminding them of their strengths and when they thought all was lost but they made it through the first year, then the second year, and are now almost done with law school.

Of course, some of these conversations quail some concerns, generate new concerns, provide new perspectives, encourage, and motivate. Students must face the inevitable, the bar exam, and their fears. The awareness of possible challenges is invaluable information to have. (Goldie Pritchard)

January 11, 2017 in Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

UCLA Director of Student Life Position

Monday, January 9, 2017

AASE Call for Proposals - January 13, 2017 Deadline

See the attached file for details: Download AASE 2017 Call for Proposals.

January 9, 2017 in Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Whittier Law Assistant Director Position

Assistant Director of Academic and Bar Support

Whittier Law School is currently accepting applications in its expanding Academic and Bar Support Department. The Academic and Bar Support Department works collaboratively to design and implement innovative curriculum to engage students in the development of legal analytical skills, transferrable throughout a student’s law school career, bar preparation, and law practice.

Specific Duties

The ideal candidate would assist and collaborate with other members of the Academic and Bar Support team with the following:

  • Collaborate with law school faculty on Academic Support and Bar programming geared towards all full time and part-time students, including workshops and skills-focused courses
  • Develop assessment tools for use throughout law school courses, including doctrinal courses, as needed
  • Teach courses and/or workshops focused on academic skill development and bar preparation, as needed
  • Support all Whittier Law School bar-takers during bar preparation, offering assistance with both substantive and skills-related concerns
  • Provide feedback on assignments and examinations through workshops and/or individual student meetings
  • Help track and report information regarding bar passage, as required by the ABA
  • Counsel students regarding law school and the bar exam, in both small and large sections
  • Track at-risk students and provide resources and support to assist them in improving the skills needed for success

Minimum Qualifications

  • Juris Doctorate from an ABA-accredited law school
  • Admission to the CA State Bar

Preferred

  • Experience in either teaching or tutoring law students
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook, and Power Point
  • Familiarity with online learning platforms
  • Experience with developing curriculum to engage various learning styles

This position is an academic staff, non-faculty position. Salary, benefits, and title are commensurate with experience. The position is a full-time position, with occasional work on weekends and evenings, as needed. Whittier Law School is an equal opportunity employer that welcomes applications for all qualified individuals.

Please submit a cover letter and resume to the Assistant Dean of Academic and Bar Support, Mary Basick, at mbasick@law.whittier.edu.

January 9, 2017 in Jobs - Descriptions & Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 6, 2017

History Lesson -- Part II

Positive life change always arises out of a failure of some sort.  Sometimes these failures are large and sometimes these failures are small, but ultimately our lives are better for them, even if they hurt at the time.

Right now, law students are starting to get their grades back from the fall semester.  The thing I hear most often from students around this time, especially from 1Ls, is "this is the worst semester grades I have ever had."  It seems like almost everyone feels this way.  I hear it from students all over the spectrum.  Just this morning, I heard it from a student who received two Ds and a student who received a B+ and an A.  Consequently, I'm guessing that almost every law student is planning on making some life changes this coming semester.

Even among those who aren't law students, the New Year is a famous time for people to make resolutions for positive life choices that only last until February.  There are two tricks to making positive life changes stick.

First, a student should look back at his or her past semester and be specific in what needs to change.  He or she should also make sure that the planned change reflects the seriousness of the failure.  As an example, after a show my band played last month, I felt so sore the next day from jumping around on stage with a guitar strapped to my shoulders that I couldn't move.  I figured the basic problem was that I've gained 50 pounds in the five years that I've lived surrounded by South Carolina's deliciousness and lack of public transportation.  So, instead of making some vague promise to myself to "work out more" or "eat healthier," I picked a few specific things I could change.  Those things were:  Dunkin Donuts only one morning a week (down from every morning), take the stairs at work, beer only two nights a week (keeping it under a six-pack and trying to stick with light beer, down from a few craft beers more or less every time we had band practice), lifting weights MWF (up from not exercising at all), and not going back for seconds at dinner (down from probably hitting thirds or fourths).  The failure I'm addressing isn't dramatic (feeling sore after rocking people's faces off), so my changes aren't that big.  If I'd been told I had a heart condition or something, I would feel motivated to do more.

The other day, I spoke with a student who didn't do as well as she had hoped, and we came up with a similar list of specifics:  leave laptop and take class notes by hand, study at undergraduate library instead of at home, do practice questions in every subject every week, and meet with Academic Success once per week.  With these specifics, I have no doubt she is going to drastically improve this coming semester (because I've seen it happen over and over and over again).

Second, if a student wants to change, that student has to seriously take a look at who he or she is.  It never seems to work if a student decides to drastically change ("I'm going to get up every day at five a.m.  to do my work, although I've alway been a night person that sleeps until 10 a.m.!") or tries to mirror a successful student whose life and personality might be drastically different.  The student has to look at himself or herself and see the places that can be tweaked.  As an example, giving up the sweet, sweet ambrosia of Dunkin Donuts and beer entirely would probably be the most effective thing to do, but I know that once I tell myself that I can't have something, that's all I'm going to want.  So, I'm letting myself have a little of both within parameters that work for me (for others, a six-pack might seem like a ridiculous amount of beer to drink in a week--my wife, who doesn't like beer, thinks it's silly, while I can't fathom the amount of ice cream she apparently needs to feel fulfilled--plus, I'm in a band, so there's some cred issues involved).  One size never fits all, and playing someone else's jam leads to bad bar bands covering "Mustang Sally" for the bazillionth time.

So, in the spirit of looking back and doing what works for you, I've included The Minutemen's "History Lesson -- Part II," the punk rock classic that provided this blog entry its title.

The Minutemen -- History Lesson Part II 

(Alex Ruskell)

 

 

January 6, 2017 in Advice | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Courage to Choose: Last Moment Course Selections

With the new academic term shortly beginning (or having just begun), you might still be shopping for an elective course as upper-level law students.  

If so, here's a friendly suggestion:  

Be courageous.

Select courses that catch your eye, that seem passionate to you, that resonate with your heart.  

Here's why?

In my opinion, regardless of your law school GPA (and perhaps contrary to some that advise taking most of the bar-related subject matter courses), if you take courses in which you are all in, in which want to go deep, in which you look forward to challenging yourself and growing as a future attorney, you will in fact develop the necessary skills to do well both on the bar exam and in the practice of law because you have found a place for your voice to shine.  

So, if you have always wanted to take a course on refugee law, even if you might not ever practice in that field, go for it.  Or, perhaps you have always wanted to learn about employment discrimination law.  Get yourself signed up immediately.

And then, take on your studies of that subject with bold-ful abandon.  Don't just read the cases. Rather, dissect them.  As you read, be aggressive with the text.  Ask yourself what is the function of each sentence and explore whether the sentences, the language, and the structure of the opinion supports the court's conclusion or instead undermines it.  Dialogue with your cases.  Don't just accept the word of the judges.  Probe, proud, and push on the opinion to see if it has any merit at all.

In the process, you will no longer be a mere spectator of the legal process but you will be an active participant.  And, significantly with respect to your future encounter with the bar exam, you will be well-positioned to demonstrate to your supreme court upon graduation that you are an adept legal problem-solver because you have learned through active engagement in law school to pay scrupulous attention to detail and to marshall your analysis in an organized lawyerly fashion.

So, listen to your heart as you choose your electives this term.  You'll be mighty glad that you did.

(Scott Johns)

January 5, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

New Semester Preparation

For those Academic Support Professionals with year-round academic support and bar support responsibilities, there are very few opportunities to plan and organize. One is constantly moving from one task to another and interacting with a variety of students who need a lot of face time. I have always admired those who are able to find a good balance between job duties, personal life, and professional development. I am still trying to strike a healthy balance and seem to fall short often.

In the years I have worked as an Academic Support Professional, I do not believe I have truly taken a vacation. Meaning, I have never completely unplugged from work related tasks. I may not check email messages but I do pick up my phone and apparently my phone seems to ring a lot when I do not check email. The one thing I have refused to do is connect my work email to my phone because I know I will never have a mental break. This year, I decided to make the concerted effort to do what I encourage students to do, truly take a break. I understand that I have to take baby steps and the first was not checking emails for three out of the seven days I had off during winter break and turning off my phone for an entire day. It was uncomfortable but I had a very positive experience because I could explore non-work related interests.

Fall break, Winter break, and Spring break give me a few days to evaluate, plan, and get ahead. I particularly appreciate Dean Jarmon’s post from day before yesterday which can be found here. She provided effective and manageable ways to do things you care about and cater to your professional development. Conferences are the one time I get to work with colleagues, share ideas with them, and learn from them. I bring back a lot of new information and feel rejuvenated. Happy conferencing ASPers! I will see many of you soon and look forward to catching up with others later this year. (Goldie Pritchard)

January 4, 2017 in Advice | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Best Articles 2016 Legal Education

Paul Caron, over on the TaxProfBlog, has included a list of the best for 2016. Several ASP and legal writing folks are the authors of some of the articles. Check it out here: Best of 2016.

January 3, 2017 in Miscellany, Publishing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 2, 2017

Happy New Year and Your Resolutions

I hope that all of our readers had blessed holidays! Some of you were snowed in; some of you were basking in the sun. Wherever you spent your time off, I know you enjoyed the break from your busy academic schedules.

AALS is this week in San Francisco. There is a plethora of sessions to attend including our Section on Academic Support business meeting and program. Other interesting programs are being offered by the Sections for Legal Research and Writing, Teaching Methods, Balance in Legal Education, and Student Services. Although I will be unable to attend this year, I will look forward to hearing about the programs from colleagues who do attend.

As you dive into the new semester and think about New Year's resolutions, I would suggest the following:

  • Pick one professional development goal for the semester: attending a regional workshop, signing up for AALS or AASE committees, writing an article for publication, finding a mentor to encourage you in your work, being a mentor for a new ASP'er, etc.
  • Pick one innovation goal for the semester: redesigning a series of workshops for your students, working more closely with student organizations, working cooperatively with career services or student services colleagues on programs that overlap your areas, etc.
  • Pick one community service goal for the semester: helping with a pro bono clinic, working at the local food bank, serving meals at a homeless shelter, socializing the animals at the local shelter, teaching Sunday School at your church, etc.
  • Pick one personal goal for the semester: reading a non-law book each month, spending more time with family, taking time for yourself each evening/weekend to rest and reflect, learning a new hobby, getting in touch with your spiritual side, etc.

We tend to make long lists of resolutions. So many, in fact, we can never meet them all! So focus on these four areas of your personal life and work and choose just one goal. Then work on sustaining that effort throughout the semester.

If you are a go-getter and complete and sustain goals easily and quickly, then set a new goal to add in each area that you have completed and sustained. But don't be an over-achiever burning the candle at both ends. Savor your goals and the processes that accompany them.

May you all have blessed semesters and success in all you resolve to do. (Amy Jarmon)

 

January 2, 2017 in Encouragement & Inspiration, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Deadline Today at Noon EST for Nominations for AALS Section on Academic Support Officers and Board Members

Good afternoon, 

I was asked recently to chair the nominations committee of the AALS Section on Academic Support.  Below  are instructions for submitting nominations.  There are four positions open:  secretary, treasurer, and two board positions.  I encourage everyone in our community to consider volunteering for these positions or nominating someone.  You can participate meaningfully even if you do not regularly attend the AALS Annual Meetings.

Best regards, 

Louis Schulze, FIU Law

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE AALS SECTION ON ACADEMIC SUPPORT

At the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in San Francisco, the Section on Academic Support will have its Business Meeting on Friday, January 6th at 7:30AM (Room TBA).  Section members will elect the 2017 Executive Committee.  The Nomination Committee is now accepting nominations for positions to be elected at the 2017 meeting. 

The Executive Committee is comprised of:  Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary, Treasurer, four board members, and the Immediate Past Chair.  Two Board Members are elected each year, serving two-year terms.  Per the bylaws’ rotation rules, Danielle Kocal (Pace) becomes the Chair of the Section for 2017, and Staci Rucker (Cincinnati) becomes Chair-elect.  Positions to be filled at the upcoming meeting: Secretary, Treasurer, and two Board Members (with terms expiring 2019).  The Secretary and Treasurer serve as a Chair or Co-Chair of a committee during the year.  Board Members serve as members of at least one committee during their terms.

Who May Be Nominated: Candidates must be faculty or professional staff at AALS-member law schools (link to AALS-member-school list: http://www.aals.org/member-schools/).  The nominated person need not be present at the AALS Annual Meeting.

Who May Submit a Nomination: You may nominate yourself or any other eligible candidate at an AALS member school.

Contents of Nomination: Nominations must be in writing and include:  (1) the candidate's name, title, institutional affiliation, and business email address; (2) a brief description of the candidate's professional role at his/her institution and connection with law school academic support (3) a statement confirming that the candidate is willing to be nominated.

Deadline: Noon (Eastern Time) on December 29, 2016.

Where to send Nominations: Send nominations to Louis Schulze at LSchulze@FIU.edu.

The process after nominations close: The Nomination Committee’s three members will confirm nominees’ interest in serving; review nominations; choose a slate of candidates to recommend at the Business Meeting; and seek additional nominations at the Business Meeting.

December 29, 2016 in Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Reminder Nominations for AALS Section on Academic Support Officers and Board Members - Deadline Tomorrow at Noon EST

Good afternoon, 

I was asked recently to chair the nominations committee of the AALS Section on Academic Support.  Below  are instructions for submitting nominations.  There are four positions open:  secretary, treasurer, and two board positions.  I encourage everyone in our community to consider volunteering for these positions or nominating someone.  You can participate meaningfully even if you do not regularly attend the AALS Annual Meetings.

Best regards, 

Louis Schulze, FIU Law

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE AALS SECTION ON ACADEMIC SUPPORT

At the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in San Francisco, the Section on Academic Support will have its Business Meeting on Friday, January 6th at 7:30AM (Room TBA).  Section members will elect the 2017 Executive Committee.  The Nomination Committee is now accepting nominations for positions to be elected at the 2017 meeting. 

The Executive Committee is comprised of:  Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary, Treasurer, four board members, and the Immediate Past Chair.  Two Board Members are elected each year, serving two-year terms.  Per the bylaws’ rotation rules, Danielle Kocal (Pace) becomes the Chair of the Section for 2017, and Staci Rucker (Cincinnati) becomes Chair-elect.  Positions to be filled at the upcoming meeting: Secretary, Treasurer, and two Board Members (with terms expiring 2019).  The Secretary and Treasurer serve as a Chair or Co-Chair of a committee during the year.  Board Members serve as members of at least one committee during their terms.

Who May Be Nominated: Candidates must be faculty or professional staff at AALS-member law schools (link to AALS-member-school list: http://www.aals.org/member-schools/).  The nominated person need not be present at the AALS Annual Meeting.

Who May Submit a Nomination: You may nominate yourself or any other eligible candidate at an AALS member school.

Contents of Nomination: Nominations must be in writing and include:  (1) the candidate's name, title, institutional affiliation, and business email address; (2) a brief description of the candidate's professional role at his/her institution and connection with law school academic support (3) a statement confirming that the candidate is willing to be nominated.

Deadline: Noon (Eastern Time) on December 29, 2016.

Where to send Nominations: Send nominations to Louis Schulze at LSchulze@FIU.edu.

The process after nominations close: The Nomination Committee’s three members will confirm nominees’ interest in serving; review nominations; choose a slate of candidates to recommend at the Business Meeting; and seek additional nominations at the Business Meeting.

December 28, 2016 in Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Reminder Nominations for AALS Section on Academic Support Officers and Board Members - Deadline 12/29/16

Good afternoon, 

I was asked recently to chair the nominations committee of the AALS Section on Academic Support.  Below  are instructions for submitting nominations.  There are four positions open:  secretary, treasurer, and two board positions.  I encourage everyone in our community to consider volunteering for these positions or nominating someone.  You can participate meaningfully even if you do not regularly attend the AALS Annual Meetings.

Best regards, 

Louis Schulze, FIU Law

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE AALS SECTION ON ACADEMIC SUPPORT

At the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in San Francisco, the Section on Academic Support will have its Business Meeting on Friday, January 6th at 7:30AM (Room TBA).  Section members will elect the 2017 Executive Committee.  The Nomination Committee is now accepting nominations for positions to be elected at the 2017 meeting. 

The Executive Committee is comprised of:  Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary, Treasurer, four board members, and the Immediate Past Chair.  Two Board Members are elected each year, serving two-year terms.  Per the bylaws’ rotation rules, Danielle Kocal (Pace) becomes the Chair of the Section for 2017, and Staci Rucker (Cincinnati) becomes Chair-elect.  Positions to be filled at the upcoming meeting: Secretary, Treasurer, and two Board Members (with terms expiring 2019).  The Secretary and Treasurer serve as a Chair or Co-Chair of a committee during the year.  Board Members serve as members of at least one committee during their terms.

Who May Be Nominated: Candidates must be faculty or professional staff at AALS-member law schools (link to AALS-member-school list: http://www.aals.org/member-schools/).  The nominated person need not be present at the AALS Annual Meeting.

Who May Submit a Nomination: You may nominate yourself or any other eligible candidate at an AALS member school.

Contents of Nomination: Nominations must be in writing and include:  (1) the candidate's name, title, institutional affiliation, and business email address; (2) a brief description of the candidate's professional role at his/her institution and connection with law school academic support (3) a statement confirming that the candidate is willing to be nominated.

Deadline: Noon (Eastern Time) on December 29, 2016.

Where to send Nominations: Send nominations to Louis Schulze at LSchulze@FIU.edu.

The process after nominations close: The Nomination Committee’s three members will confirm nominees’ interest in serving; review nominations; choose a slate of candidates to recommend at the Business Meeting; and seek additional nominations at the Business Meeting.

December 27, 2016 in Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 24, 2016

Happy Holidays to Our Readers

All of us here at the Law School Academic Support Blog wish you and yours the happiest of holiday seasons. Enjoy the days off while your law school is closed. Spend time with family and friends. Eat lots of wonderful food. Catch up on sleep and recharge your batteries. Count your many blessings. Best wishes for 2017!

The Blog will be taking a partial holiday break with a few posts and resume daily posts after the new year begins.

 

December 24, 2016 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 23, 2016

Call for Nominations for AALS Section on Academic Support Officers and Board Members - Deadline 12/29/16

Good afternoon, 

I was asked Friday to chair the nominations committee of the AALS Section on Academic Support.  Below  are instructions for submitting nominations.  There are four positions open:  secretary, treasurer, and two board positions.  I encourage everyone in our community to consider volunteering for these positions or nominating someone.  You can participate meaningfully even if you do not regularly attend the AALS Annual Meetings.

Best regards, 

Louis Schulze, FIU Law

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE AALS SECTION ON ACADEMIC SUPPORT

At the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in San Francisco, the Section on Academic Support will have its Business Meeting on Friday, January 6th at 7:30AM (Room TBA).  Section members will elect the 2017 Executive Committee.  The Nomination Committee is now accepting nominations for positions to be elected at the 2017 meeting. 

The Executive Committee is comprised of:  Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary, Treasurer, four board members, and the Immediate Past Chair.  Two Board Members are elected each year, serving two-year terms.  Per the bylaws’ rotation rules, Danielle Kocal (Pace) becomes the Chair of the Section for 2017, and Staci Rucker (Cincinnati) becomes Chair-elect.  Positions to be filled at the upcoming meeting: Secretary, Treasurer, and two Board Members (with terms expiring 2019).  The Secretary and Treasurer serve as a Chair or Co-Chair of a committee during the year.  Board Members serve as members of at least one committee during their terms.

Who May Be Nominated: Candidates must be faculty or professional staff at AALS-member law schools (link to AALS-member-school list: http://www.aals.org/member-schools/).  The nominated person need not be present at the AALS Annual Meeting.

Who May Submit a Nomination: You may nominate yourself or any other eligible candidate at an AALS member school.

Contents of Nomination: Nominations must be in writing and include:  (1) the candidate's name, title, institutional affiliation, and business email address; (2) a brief description of the candidate's professional role at his/her institution and connection with law school academic support (3) a statement confirming that the candidate is willing to be nominated.

Deadline: Noon (Eastern Time) on December 29, 2016.

Where to send Nominations: Send nominations to Louis Schulze at LSchulze@FIU.edu.

The process after nominations close: The Nomination Committee’s three members will confirm nominees’ interest in serving; review nominations; choose a slate of candidates to recommend at the Business Meeting; and seek additional nominations at the Business Meeting.

December 23, 2016 in Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Breaking Free from the Stress and Strains of Final Exams: Try Out the "Smile Loop!"

Wow.  At long last, final exams are over...sort of.

For most of us, we have a very difficult time with uncertainty in general, which is particularly exasperating as we wait - sometimes for weeks - for our grades to arrive.

So, despite the festive times of this month, we often find ourselves unable to relax, to enjoy the season, and to simply wind down and rest.  

Nevertheless, there's a simple way - in just a flash of a moment - to help break free from the many stresses and strains of the past few weeks of final exams.  Why not try out, today, the "smile loop?"  It sounds, sort of, fun, doesn't it?  So, here's the scoop (and the science too):

You see, according to an excellent article in the Wall Street Journal by Elizabeth Bernstein:

"Smiling produces neural messaging in your brain that makes you happier. Some studies have shown that when we smile our facial muscles contract, which slightly distorts the shape of the thin facial bones.  This leads to an increase in blood flow into the frontal lobes of the brain and the release of the feel-good chemical dopamine. And, when we smile at someone, that person tends to smile back. So, we've created a feel-good loop."  http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-fall-back-in-love

For those of you that are not scientists (that's me!), the short scoop is that smiling brightens not just our days but the days of those around us.  And, it sure seems to me that smiling at another person gets us on the right track to thinking about others rather than worrying about the past few weeks of final exams (with its lingering wait for grades).  

I had the chance to put smiling to the test in very unforgiving circumstances over the course of the past few weeks as a volunteer attorney.  There's a little Greek island just a few short miles off the Turkish coast.  Because of its locale so close to Turkey, thousands of people have been fleeing on small inflatable boats across the Aegean Sea to escape persecution, calamity, and in some cases war in their native countries - from Syria to Iran to Iraq to Afghanistan to South Sudan - with the hope of receiving refugee in the European Union.  I talked with a man, his wife and his adorable small children that risked it all traveling by land from Afghanistan through Iran and Turkey only to be finally living for months in a small UNHCR tent in a refugee camp on the island of Chios.

Despite the lack of resources and the uncertainty of still waiting - for months on end - to receive as of yet an asylum hearing, he smiled.  And, then his children smiled. Why, his whole family smiled.  In the cold of the wind swept coast of this little island refugee camp, we all smiled...together.  He and his family may not have had much to give but they gave something immeasurably priceless...they shared smiles with me.  

Let me say, this was not unique.  As I walked through the refugee camp with a number of refugee-seekers, even though we often didn't speak the same language, we were able to communicate in ways that are often richer than words.  Over and over, refugees would just come up to me with big generous smiles and warm handshakes of greetings.  Memorably, a small Syrian boy grabbed my hand one day by the lunch tent as a group of young people were dancing, asking me to join in the footsteps and singing.

You see, smiles are not just a trick to make your life better or happier.  No, no at all!   Rather, smiles are the sweetness of life itself in helping us to make the world a little better for others.  So, as you wait for final exam grades to come in, be of good courage and share smiles with those around you.  Who knows?  That brief smile might get you up and dancing!

(Scott Johns).

December 22, 2016 in Advice, Encouragement & Inspiration, Exams - Studying, Stress & Anxiety, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0)